Magazines

Here are some of our MAGAZINES available for purchase:

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Abraham Lincoln Association Papers Complete Run 1924-39 SIGNED
This is a complete run of the Abraham Lincoln Association Papers from Vol. 1 (1924) to Vol. 15 (1939), in fifteen annual bound volumes, many of them signed. Octavos. Hardbacks, with canvas spines and paper-covered boards. VG, scuffing. The Abraham Lincoln Association was formed in 1908 to spearhead the centennial celebration of Lincoln’s birth. It saw no reason to disband after the festivities and indeed continues today. In 1924 they launched their first publishing effort, an annual volume that printed the papers delivered before the association at its Lincoln birthday gathering each February. In those days, the Association was an intimate affair, made up of Lincoln scholars, descendants of Lincoln’s associates and friends, and Lincoln boosters. The set contains addresses on such topics as Lincoln’s legal practice, his relationship with Douglas, his plans for reunion (Nevins), his genius (Sandburg), his spirituality, his power with words (Angle), his humor (Thomas), his house, etc. This set is distinctive because many of the volumes are signed by participants, the most noteworthy being Lincoln scholars Benjamin Thomas (4 times), Paul Angle (2), and Harry Pratt (2), former Indiana senator and Lincoln biographer Albert Beveridge (1), Illinois governor Henry Horner (3), and president of the association Logan Hay, John Hay’s cousin. Beginning in 1940, the association commenced publishing the Abraham Lincoln Quarterly. $600

America’s First Sporting Monthly

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American Turf Register and Sporting Magazine (Baltimore/New York)
The first sporting magazine in America, the American Turf Register and Sporting Magazine reflected the prevailing tastes of the era and was consequently primarily a horse racing journal, but it covered other sporting activities as well, especially hunting and fishing. It was a handsome magazine, well illustrated with steel engravings, stone lithographs, and, rarely, wood engravings. In 1841, The Knickerbocker proclaimed that the Turf Register had no “superior in any country, for various merits, sporting, literary and pictorial.”  This was not the usual parochial puffery – the Turf Register was a great magazine, deserving of a far longer life than its 15 years. Later volumes of the Turf Register, when it was owned by William T. Porter of the Spirit of the Times, are quite uncommon, especially with wrappers bound in. Periodyssey offers the following volumes:

Vol. 3, No. 1 (September 1831) to No. 12 (August 1832), comprising twelve issues, bound in red leather and marbled boards. Leather VG, scuffed and worn, especially at tips, boards rubbed. Contents near fine. Nine engravings, one of which is on wood, one lithograph, and two foldout bloodline charts. One of the engravings is stained and the bloodline charts have small tears. All are of horses, except one of a fox hunt one of deer hunting, and one of grouse. SOLD

Vol. 5, No. 1 (September 1833) to No. 12 (August 1834), comprising twelve issues, bound in red leather and marbled boards. Leather VG, scuffed and worn, especially at tips, boards rubbed. Contents near fine. Twelve engravings, two of which are on wood and one a foldout of a horse skeleton (repaired). All are of horses, except one of deer hunting on horseback, one of a horse race, one of a turkey trap, and one of a trout. $200

Vol. 6, No. 1 (September 1834) to No. 12 (August 1835), comprising twelve issues, bound in red leather and marbled boards. Leather VG, scuffed and worn, especially at tips, boards rubbed. Contents near fine. Eight engravings, two of which are on wood, and three lithographs. All are of horses, except two of fox hunts, one of canvas back geese, and one of a setter. $200

Vol. 7, No. 1 (September 1835) to No. 12 (August 1836), comprising twelve issues, bound in brown leather and marbled boards. Leather fair, well worn, boards rubbed. Contents VG, with foxing. Ten engravings, all of which are horses. $200

Vol. 8, No. 1 (September 1836) to No. 12 (November 1837), comprising twelve issues (issues for June, August, October, and December never published), bound in brown leather and marbled boards. Leather fair, well worn, front hinge cracked but sound, boards rubbed. Contents VG, with foxing. All wrappers (tinted and decorated) bound in (rare thus). Six of eight plates present, all of which are horses. Five are engravings and one a lithograph. $200

The Porter Volumes

Vol. 12, No. 1 (January 1841) to No. 12 (December 1841), comprising twelve issues, bound in brown leather and marbled boards. Leather good, well worn, boards rubbed. Contents VG-, with foxing, occasional stains and small tears. Six of the issues are bound with wrappers (rare thus). Thirteen “embellishments” (frontispieces, extra plates, and illustrations in the text) called for; eight are present. One of the frontispieces has a quarter-size divot in it. $250

Vol. 14, No. 1 (January 1843) to No. 12 (December 1843), comprising twelve issues, bound in brown leather and marbled boards. Leather fair, well worn, hinges cracked but still sound, boards rubbed. Contents VG+, with occasional foxing. Eleven of the issues are bound with wrappers (rare thus). Thirteen “embellishments” (frontispieces, extra plates, and illustrations in the text) called for; twelve are present. $300

Complete Runs of the First Two Series

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Annals of Iowa (Iowa City)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1863) to Vol. 12, No. 4 (October 1874) (along with) New Series Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1882) to NS Vol. 2, No. 4 (October 1883), comprising 56 issues in all, two complete runs, bound in 14 volumes of leather and cloth, the first series in blue, the second in brown. Volume 2 of the first series is supplied in facsimile. Octavos. In 1863, in his capacity as librarian of the Iowa State Historical Society, Samuel Storrs Howe launched the Annals of Iowa. It was a handsome product. Early issues were 48 pages, later issues ran to 80 pages. Each issue featured an attractive engraved frontis, almost always of an Iowan of note, with a biographical sketch to accompany it. The quarterly also featured county histories, recollections by early settlers, Native American history, historical sketches, notes on the landscape, poetry, letters, and Historical Society business. That it survived the Civil War and nearly ten years beyond was a tribute to Howe’s steady hand. The financial depression of 1873 ended the magazine’s first run. After Howe retired, he relaunched the magazine as an independent publication, entirely under his ownership and direction. Like its predecessor, it contained the same mix of profiles of cities and towns, prominent sons, and important institutions, notes on the landscape, etc. Most of the issues continued the tradition of a handsome frontispiece, the most notable one in the second series being of Sitting Bull. But the institutional backing that had sustained the first series was lacking for the second; Howe discontinued it after only eight issues. It was once again revived by the Historical Society in 1893 and continues to be published today. $500

Bierce, Pollard, and other Anti-Cranks

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The Anti-Philistine (London)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (June 15, 1897) to No. 4 (September 15, 1897), bound in blue cloth. A complete run. Octavo. Binding fair, with rubbing and wear to the spine, splitting to the cloth on the rear outer hinge; contents near fine. All covers and advertising bound in. John Cowley, publisher of The Anti-Philistine, dedicated the magazine to “all those who hate the Philistines, and are willing to support this movement for their extinction…, all those who like really good literature, the best fiction, [and] the best poetry…” He capitalized “philistines” to make clear that he wasn’t referring to the type generically, but rather to all those who worshiped at the feet of Elbert Hubbard and who had made his chap-book of that name surprisingly popular. In truth, The Anti-Philistine had more in common with Hubbard and his coterie than either had with the prevailing school of artificial gentility then dominant in American letters. Cowley’s blast at tradition was loaded with American writers whose work epitomized this rejection of prevailing tastes, including Ambrose Bierce (6 contributions), Bierce’s protege Percival Pollard (3 contributions), Edgar Saltus (3 contributions), and others. A superior, short-lived magazine. $225

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Appleton’s Journal Magazine Winslow Homer American Views Bound 1869-70
This is a four-volume run of Appleton’s Journal, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (April 3, 1869) to Vol. 4, No. 92 (December 31, 1870), bound in contemporary half leather and marbled boards. Quartos. Bindings scuffed and bumped at tips, handsome, VG+; contents near fine, with a few marginal tears to foldouts. Some of the foldouts poorly folded in. Ghosting to the June 19, 1869, Homer cover. Appleton’s Journal ran for seven years as a weekly, but only the first two years of the magazine are heavily illustrated. These volumes contain twenty-five “cartoons,” the curious label Appleton’s applied to stand-alone illustrations that accompanied select issues. The most impressive of these are beautiful cityscapes and landscapes (“The Grand Drive at Central Park,” “Fairmount Park, Philadelphia,” “The Levee at New Orleans,” etc.), measuring up to 11″ high by 28″ long. Also featured are fourteen steel engravings of American locales, which inspired the famous two-volume work, Picturesque America, later in the decade. Winslow Homer contributed ten illustrations to these volumes (Beam #152-159, 176, 177), of which five are covers, one a tipped-in doublespread (“The Fishing Party”), and one a large fold-out (“On the Beach at Long Branch” [9.5″ X 13″]). The volumes also contain illustrated supplements devoted to specific subjects, such as “Underground Life; or Coal-Mines and Miners” and “New York Illustrated,” a profusely illustrated 16-page tour of the city. The first volume contains the first American excerpt of Jules Verne’s Journey to the Center of the Earth and the third and fourth volumes contain monthly installments of Charles Dickens’ Mystery of Edwin Drood. Mott says, “Few periodicals of the years following the Civil War furnished a better picture of the varied life of the times than the weekly Appleton’s Journal did from 1869 to 1876.” (Mott III/417). This is a nice set. $600

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The Booklovers Magazine (Philadelphia)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1903) to Vol. 4, No. 6 (December 1904), comprising the first 24 issues, bound by the publisher in four volumes of red cloth. Octavos. Bindings VG, with edge wear. Contents near fine. The Booklovers Magazine was a handsome effort, profusely illustrated with full-page color and black and white plates and printed on quality paper. The editor was Seymour Eaton, who later attained fame as the author of the Teddy Bear books. Mott says of the magazine “The Booklovers was different from other magazines. Its uniqueness consisted in the combination of three kinds of content: (1) short, signed editorials on all kinds of subjects by famous and near-famous people; (2) a lot of brief eclectic miscellany clipped from periodicals, and (3) copious illustration, much of it in color. It was of the same size as other standard magazines, whether they sold for ten cents or twenty-five, but one had only to glance inside the cover of the Booklovers to see how different it was. What Eaton was doing was plain enough: he was attempting to capitalize on the popular magazine trends toward concise brevity and bright illustration.” That formula notwithstanding, Eaton was not afraid to treat some subjects in depth. For example, the Booklovers included long profiles series that focused on magazine publishers,  actors, railroad magnates, etc., and lengthy essays on Emerson,  Robert Burns, Bill Nye, Bret Harte, de Maupassant, de Balzac, and others. A highlight of the first year was a beautifully illustrated article by W.E. B. du Bois on the leaders of the “Colored Race”. Contributors included Julian Ralph, Norman Hapgood, Willis Abbot, Hamlin Garland, Brander Matthews, Theodore Dreiser, Ella Wheeler Wilcox, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Julian Hawthorne, and others. G.G Wiederseim and V. Floyd Campbell were significant artistic contributors. The magazine prospered, so much so that it caught the eye of the New York publishing house D. Appleton. They bought it in 1905 and rechristened Appleton’s Booklovers Magazine. They could not achieve their greater vision for the magazine and gave it up with the June 1909 issue. The magazine during Eaton’s years at the helm is impressive. $150

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Boston Journal of Natural History (Boston)
Vol. 1, No. 1 [April 1834] to Vol. 6, No. 2 (January 1850), comprising sixteen years of transactions of this important scientific society, bound in six volumes of leather and marbled boards. Octavos. Bindings VG, with scuffing and label ghosting to spines. Contents near fine, with foxing. The Boston Journal of Natural History was the official publication of the Boston Society of Natural History founded in 1830 and dedicated to the study and promotion of natural history. In 1834 it resolved to publish the papers delivered before the Society in the form of a journal that appeared sporadically. Subjects covered in the journal include “Remarks in Defense of the Author of Birds of America,” “An Inquiry into the Distinctive Characteristics of Aboriginal Races of America,” “Dissection of a Spermaceti Whale,” descriptions of new species of insects and crustaceans, many papers of observations on birds, fish, reptiles, and shells, geological contributions by Edward Hitchcock, and varied contributions by founders Amos Binney Jr., Edward Brooks, Walter Channing, Henry Codman, George B. Emerson, and others. Like its sister publication, the American Journal of Science and the Arts, the Boston Journal was well illustrated. These volumes contain 108 single page lithographs, 15 single-page color lithographs, 9 foldout lithographs and 1 map (geology of Portland). In 1951 the Society evolved into the Museum of Science and relocated to its current site on the Charles River. This is a scarce run of an important early American science journal. $1,800

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Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine Edgar Allan Poe 1840
This is a bound volume of Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine Vol. 6, No. 1 (January 1840) through Vol. 7, No. 6 (December 1840), comprising the final eleven issues of Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine and the first issue of Graham’s Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s Magazine (adopting the numbering of Burton’s), bound in brown calf leather and marbled boards. Octavo. Binding VG+, handsome. Contents near fine, clean and attractive. This volume contains five of the issues Poe edited (January to May 1840), all five installments of “The Journal of Julius Rodman,” the short stories “Peter Pendulum” and “The Man of the Crowd,” the two final installments of “Field Sports and Manly Pastimes,” all five installments of “Omniana,” all four installments of “A Chapter on Science and Art,” two essays, and 23 book and magazine reviews. William Burton was well known as an actor when he decided in 1837 to launch Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine. Successful from the start, it featured much written by Burton himself, who was assisted by a corps of New York and Philadelphia scribblers. The mercurial Southern, Edgar Allan Poe, first wrote for the magazine in February 1839, became Burton’s co-editor with the July issue, and maintained his connection with the magazine nearly to its end. In all, he contributed 123 pieces, including his masterpiece of horror, “The Fall of the House of Usher,” and the distinguished five-part, “Journal of Julius Rodman.” Burton found working with Poe increasingly difficult and let him go in May 1840. Then he tired of the entire enterprise, selling out at the end of the year to George Graham, who combined Burton’s with the Casket to form Graham’s Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s Magazine, which had its debut in December 1840. For all of its popularity, Burton’s Magazine is scarce. This is the most attractive example that we have ever handled of this year. $1,200

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Butterfly Quarterly George Wolfe Plank Complete Run 1907-09
This is a complete run of George Wolfe Plank’s Butterfly Quarterly, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (Autumn 1907) to Vol. 2, No. 3 (Summer 1909), comprising seven issues in original wrappers. Quartos and small folios. All issues VG or better, with chipping to wrapper overhangs and occasionally, to spines. The Butterfly Quarterly was the design work of 24-year-old George Wolfe Plank, who later became a leading cover artist for Vogue during its most beautiful years in the teens and twenties. Plank published the magazine along with Margaret Scott, Alice Smith, and Amy Smith from 1907 through 1909. Its content, featuring prose, poetry, and art, classifies it as a “little magazine” in the style of the Chap-Book of the 1890’s, but it was not little in format. Contributors included Sadakicki Hartmann, Gordon Craig (artwork), and a very young Louis Untermeyer (“A Portrait,” “Isadora Duncan Dancing” “The Dying Decadent” and an essay), but the star of the show was Plank, who contributed more than two dozen woodcuts and two dozen drawings. The art displayed his fluid talent, especially for bookplates, of which several are tipped in, and presaged his brilliant career. The Butterfly was strictly limited to 500 copies per issue; each copy is numbered. It is a notoriously fragile publication, so this run constitutes a better than average complete set. $750

A “Challenging and Excellent” Little Magazine

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William Arrowsmith, et. al. (editor) The Chimera, A Rough Beast (Princeton, NJ/New York). Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 1942) to Vol. 3, No. 4 (Summer 1945), comprising 12 issues, the first three (out of five) volumes complete. Octavos. Original colored wrappers. VG to near fine with smudging to a few wrappers. Contents near fine. $250
          In 1948, Hoffman wrote, “One of the most challenging and excellent of recent little magazines, The Chimera is eclectic in its table of contents, but marked by an editorial taste and discrimination which brings to the magazine poetry and criticism of important writers.” Contributors included W. H. Auden, Wallace Stevens, John Paul Sartre, Pablo Neruda, Henry Miller, Robert Lowell, Randall Jarrell, Kenneth Burke, R. P. Blackmur, Allen Tate, John Berryman, Kenneth Patchen, Babette Deutsch, Arthur Rimbaud, Arthur Koestler, Richard Eberhart, Eve Merriam, and others. Initially published out of Princeton, it moved to New York City with its second issue, and perished there in 1947.

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Christian Union / Christian World Missionary Magazine 1850-62
This is a thirteen year run of the American and Foreign Christian Union/ Christian World magazine, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1850) to Vol. 13, No. 12 (December 1862), comprising 156 issues, bound in twelve volumes of black leather and marbled boards. Bindings VG+, with notable edge wear to four volumes. Contents VG, with old water stains to four of the volumes. The American and Foreign Christian Union was formed in 1849 upon the merging of three complimentary missionary societies; the American Protestant Society, the Foreign Evangelical Society and the Christian Alliance. In 1850, to facilitate communication and publicize its good works, the Union began publishing a monthly magazine. It was a handsome production. Each issue sported an engraved portrait of a leading Christian light, past or present, and was full of missionary news. Union workers were indefatigable as only it seems missionaries can be, accosting the Portuguese immigrants in eastern seaports, Mexicans along the Rio Grande, German Catholics in the Midwest, Frenchies who had strayed over the border into New York from Quebec, as well as the entire populations of benighted countries like Ireland and Hayti (sic). Later it moved into the Sandwich Islands and the Pacific Rim nations. In an effort to better know what they were up against, a significant amount of space was devoted to the rites and rituals of Catholicism. By 1860, the AFCU was thriving, supported 73 workers in the U.S. and more than 200 abroad. This turned out to be the Union’s high-water mark as one denomination after another began establishing their own independent missions. Today, the Union continues but with horns pulled in. It supports three protestant churches in Catholic strongholds in Europe. $450

A Rare WWI Radical Magazine

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The Class Struggle. Devoted to International Socialism (New York)
Vol. 1, Nos. 1 (October 1918), 2, and 4; Vol. 2, Nos.1-4; and Vol. 3, Nos. 2 and 4 (October 1919), comprising nine issues out of a total of thirteen issues published. Octavos. Original printed wrappers. Spines of five issues quite chipped (with wrappers of penultimate issue detached), light marginal discoloration to last issue, otherwise generally very good. Goldwater said of the magazine that it was an “ultra-radical Socialist (later Communist) bi-monthly and quarterly, edited by Louis Boudin, Louis Fraina and Ludwig Lore; later Eugene Debs and others served briefly on the editorial board”. In addition to native contributions, The Class Struggle includes articles and documents by Lenin, Trotsky, Marx, Rosa Luxemburg, Kautsky, et al. Events in Russia come in for considerable coverage, as does the IWW trial. It was at the end a publication of the Communist Labor Party of America, which merged with another group in 1920 to form the United Communist Party of America. It is difficult to track this publication on OCLC because of its generic name. New York University may have a set of the original printings. Stanford has a set on microfiche. Scarce. $400

Sherlock Holmes in Collier’s

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Collier’s. November 26, 1904. Folio. VG+ covers (light marginal stain), near fine interior. Features Sherlock Holmes cover art by Steele and A. Conan Doyle’s “The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter.” $150

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Collier’s. December 31, 1904. Folio. Near fine. Features Sherlock Holmes cover art by Steele and A. Conan Doyle’s “The Adventure of the Abbey Grange.” $150

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Dodge’s Literary Museum (Boston)
Vol. 6, No. 1 (December 11, 1852) to No. 26 (June 4, 1853), comprising 26 issues in all, bound in quarter-leather and paper-covered boards. Small folio. Binding fair, general wear, rubbing to edges, paper well worn. Contents good with staining to endpapers and the usual spotting and occasional toning throughout. Ossian Dodge was a singer and comedian of modest renown until he bought his way into the history books by paying P.T. Barnum $625 for the first ticket to Jenny Lind’s concert debut in Boston in 1850. From 1848 to 1854, he also published his Literary Museum. It was a typical literary weekly of the period, filled with second-rate fiction, poetry, and other miscellany. What makes this volume fascinating is the first appearance serialization of two works of fiction about African-Americans. The first serialization, entitled “The Faithful Slave,” by Kentuckian Robert Morris, purported to be a fictionalized account of a true story that occurred in the late 1830’s in Mississippi. Each of the eight installments is illustrated, including a bizarre, salacious head-piece of a bare-breasted Black woman in seductive recline. It tells the story of a house slave named Loogy, who exhibits a “spaniel-like devotion” to her master. She is falsely accused of stealing $20,000 dollars of her master’s money. He whips her of course (the engraving of the whipping scene shows Loogy tied to a tree as the whip cuts “through her flimsy chemise”) and then, when she still does not admit to the crime, sells her. Eventually, the true villain is exposed and the money found. Loogy is retrieved from her new slave master (who mistreated her) and the story ends with her happily reunited with her original owner. Dodge advertised this tale as “absolutely superior to Mrs. Stowe’s late work.”  The second serialization, which ran through three issues, was entitled, “The Rising of ’76 or the Negro’s Dead Shot,” by “(blank) Smith, Esq.” It is a Revolutionary War romance set in Massachusetts, in which a Black slave named “Kit” figures as the hero. Both stories are fascinating political documents from the 1850’s. $200

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The Dome (London)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (March 1897) to New Series Vol. 7, No. 19/20/21 (May-July 1900), comprising five quarterly issues and twenty-one monthly issues, a complete run, in original hardbound and wrappered bindings. Octavos. Bindings near fine, except for No. 1, with stains to the boards, Nos. 16, 17,and 18, with chipping to the spines, and No. 19/20/21, the final triple issue, with marginal staining throughout and mildew to the final ten pages. Vol. 1, Issues 4 and 5 come with the elusive (chipped) dustjackets. The Dome, a celebrated quarterly, then monthly, published by the Unicorn Press and edited by Ernest J. Oldmeadow, was the last of the 1890s literary magazines that was both part of the aesthetic movement and widely popular. More than its predecessors The Yellow Book and The Savoy (which focused mostly on literature), The Dome dealt with several arts. Every issue was divided into four sections: architecture (and sometimes sculpture) with illustrations, literature, visual arts with illustrations, and music with actual scores often included. It was known for its in-depth studies of painters, which rose above the level of mere appreciations, and for the championing of promising talent. The art ranged over the centuries. Charles Holmes’ discussion of Japanese prints by Hiroshige and Hokusai were particularly important in directing attention to the oriental arts that influenced European modernism. Important contributors included  Lucas Cranach (woodcuts “The Annunciation”, “A Saxon Prince on Horseback”), E. Gordon Craig, Edward Elgar (a piano solo minuet and a song Love alone will stay), Roger Fry, Laurence Housman (stories “The Troubling of the Waters” and “Little Saint Michael”), Alice Meynell, Arthur Symons, and William Butler Yeats (a poem “The Desire of Man and of Woman”). Complete runs in originals boards and wrappers are scarce. $500

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Educational Review Nicholas Murray Butler Columbia 1891-95
This is a five-year bound run of Nicholas Murray Butler’s Educational Review, Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1891) to Vol. 10, No. 5 (December 1895), comprising 50 numbers, bound in ten volumes. Bindings VG, with smudging to spine where library numbers used to be. The first nine are in the publisher’s terra cotta cloth binding, the tenth volume in green cloth. Contents VG, with library puncture stamps to some pages and pockets on rear paste-downs. The tenth volume has front covers bound in. All volumes indexed. The Educational Review, a monthly (not published in July and August), was founded by Nicholas Murray Butler and edited by him for the first thirty years of its long run (1891-1928). Butler was regarded as a twenty-four year old wunderkind when he was appointed to the philosophy department faculty at Columbia in 1885. His interest in how humans learn prompted him in 1887 to co-found, and become president of, the New York School for the Training of Teachers, which later affiliated with Columbia University and was renamed Teachers College, Columbia University. In 1891, the ever restless Butler founded the Educational Review to further promote his interest in the philosophy of education. He succeeded in attracting the best minds in education to its pages and it quickly became, in Mott’s words, “the leading scholarly journal in the field of general education.” Butler was so devoted to the journal that he continued to edit it long after he was appointed president of Columbia in 1902. This is the only run we have ever handled. $200

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T.S. Eliot/The Dial (New York)
Vol. 73, No. 5 (November 1922), containing the first American appearance of T.S. Eliot’s masterpiece “The Waste Land.” Octavo. Near fine, with a smudge and a few stray lines to front cover and a half inch chip to top of spine. Contents near fine. T. S. Eliot’s long poem “The Waste Land” is widely regarded as one of the most important poems of the 20th century and a central text in Modernist poetry. Published in 1922, the 434-line poem first appeared in the U.K. in the October issue of The Criterion and in the U.S. the following month in this issue of The Dial. It was published in book form in December 1922. The poem loosely follows the legend of the Holy Grail and the Fisher King combined with vignettes of the contemporary social condition in British society. Among its famous phrases are “April is the cruellest month”, “I will show you fear in a handful of dust”, and the mantra in the Sanskrit language “Shantih shantih shantih”. While most issues of The Dial from the twenties are not particularly scarce, this issue is unaccountably so. $1,000

A Complete Run

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Farmington Magazine (Farmington, CT)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (November 1900) to Vol. 2, No. 4 (October 1902), comprising twelve monthly issues and four quarterly issues, a complete run, bound in two volumes of leather and marbled boards. Quartos. Bindings good, wear to spines and hinges, hinges tender, still handsome. Contents near fine. All covers and advertisements bound in. The Farmington Magazine, an attractive small quarto, was launched in November 1900 “for all who feel an interest in the village of Farmington, its people, its activities, and its surroundings.” That there were only a little more than 3,000 inhabitants of the village at this time suggests the magazine was a bold business venture; that it survived for sixteen issues is a tribute to the editor’s taste and aesthetic. The magazine featured historical sketches, reminiscences, artwork, profiles,nature notes, book reviews, poetry, and news squibs. In one sense it was part of the little magazine movement of the period, but it differed from its brethren in its large format and local focus. Few towns of this size then or now can boast of such an accomplished product. $225

Great Civil War Battlescape Fold-outs

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Weekly and War Supplement (New York)
In 1862, Frank Leslie attempted to cash in on the fever for Civil War news by issuing war supplements to a dozen or so regular issues throughout the late winter and spring. It was a costly endeavor, soon discontinued, but the War Supplements were printing wonders and usually featured quadruple-spread wood engravings that measured nearly four foot long. Many of these engravings failed to survive intact because they were mutilated in the binding process. The best way to find them is in issues that were never trimmed, never bound. Periodyssey offers two such issues, with the quadruple-spread wood engravings as the featured highlight:

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“The War in Tennessee – View of the Principal Works at Fort Donelson, Including the Water Batteries, with the National Gunboats on the Cumberland River, and a Distant View of the Town of Dover – Morning of the Surrender – Exhibition of White Flags on the Works – Capitulation of the Rebels, and National Troops Marching to Occupy the Fortifications – From a Sketch by H. Lovie.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, March 15, 1862. Regular issue and War Supplement. Issue VG, never bound, with edge wear and archival repairs. Wood engraving: 16″ x 46″. Near fine. The issue and supplement are profusely illustrated and feature text on the capture of Fort Donelson, Grant’s first Union victory, and other war news. $150

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“The War in North Carolina – The Battle of Newberne – Final and Successful Charge of the National Troops under General Burnside on the Rebel Fortifications, their Capture, and Utter Rout of the Rebel Army, March 14 – From a Sketch by our Special Artist, Mr. Schell.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, April 5, 1862. Regular issue and War Supplement. Issue VG, never bound, with edge wear and archival repairs. Wood engraving: 16.5″ x 46. 25″. VG+ with chips to left and right margins and top and bottom of center crease. The issue and supplement are profusely illustrated and feature text on the Battle of Newberne, a rare early Union victory, and other war news. $125

An incomparable window into antebellum life in America

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Gleason’s Pictorial Drawing Room Companion (Boston)
Vol. 2, No. 1 (January 3, 1852) to No. 26 (June 26, 1852), comprising a total of 26 issues, bound in publisher’s black and gilt cloth. Folio. Binding near fine, exceptionally bright and clean. Contents near fine with occasional foxing. Frontispiece and index included. Upon its introduction in May of 1851, the Pictorial was an immediate success — so successful, in fact, that it spawned two mighty competitors — Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper in 1855 and Harper’s Weekly in 1857 — that eventually put it out of business. These volumes provide a glimpse into the earliest days of illustrated journalism. Each volume features dozens of city views, portrait of leading men of the day, coverage of major events, such as elections, funerals, and natural disasters, and engravings that chronicled daily life. The first seven volumes were published by James Gleason. He then sold the magazine to his editor, Maturin Ballou, who conducted the Pictorial under his own name for ten more volumes, until December 1859. The run constitutes an incomparable window into antebellum life in America. Highlights of this volume include statehouse views in Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Virginia; coverage of the Portland, Maine, Fire of 1852; an engraving of the US Capitol; coverage of Kossuth’s visit to the US; portraits of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Gleason, and Maturin Ballou; and city views of New Orleans, San Francisco, Houston, Galveston, and the “City of Oregon, Oregon Territory.” $125

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The Golden Hind Quarterly Arts and Letters Magazine October 1923
This is the October 1923 issue of The Golden Hind, the great arts and literary quarterly published in London in the early 1920s. Small folio. Near fine. Contributors include Victor Black, J. C. Chadwick, Ethel Mayne, Norman Davey, John Austen Haydn Mackey, Louis Moreau, Grace Rogers, and others. $150

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The Golden Hind Quarterly Arts and Letters Magazine April 1924
This is the April 1924 issue of The Golden Hind, the great arts and literary quarterly published in London in the early 1920s. Small folio. Near fine. Contributors include L.A.G. Strong, Graham Green, John Austen, Haydn Mackey, Grace Rogers, Evelyn Waugh, and others. $150

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The Golden Hind Quarterly Arts and Letters Magazine July 1924
This is the July 1924 issue of The Golden Hind, the great arts and literary quarterly published in London in the early 1920s. Small folio. Near fine. Contributors include L.A.G. Strong, Kathleen Freeman, Ethel Mayne, John Austen, Grace Rogers, Evelyn Waugh, and others. $150

Poe and Company

Graham’s Lady’s and Gentleman’s Magazine of Literature and Art (Philadelphia)
It is not known if the youthful George Graham (born 1813) bought the Casket and Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine with the idea that by merging them, he would achieve publishing greatness, but that is what he did. He purchased the first in 1839 and the second in 1840, then combined them and brought out the first issue of Graham’s Lady’s and Gentleman’s Magazine in December of that year, the new magazine being superior to its progenitors in nearly every respect. The contributor’s list of the new magazine would eventually read like a who’s who of 19th century American literary greats: William Cullen Bryant, James Fenimore Cooper, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, James Russell Lowell, Mrs. Sigourney, Ann Stephens, Nathaniel Parker Willis, etc. etc. Edgar Allan Poe served as editor for a bit more than a year in 1841 and 1842 and contributed some of his greatest work to its pages, both during his editorship and after. Adding to Graham’s luster was the fact that it was better illustrated than any earlier or contemporary magazine, boasting two or three steel engravings and usually a hand-colored fashion plate with each issue. Graham managed to pull it all off by engaging in two seemingly simple practices: he required his subscribers to pay up-front and he paid contributors reliably and well, neither of which had ever been done before. While the magazine was published until 1858, the decade of the Forties was its golden age. Periodyssey offers the following volumes:

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Graham’s Lady’s and Gentleman’s Magazine of Literature and Art
Vol. 20, No. 1 (January 1842) to Vol. 21, No. 6 (December 1842), comprising a complete year of 12 issues. Bound in black quarter leather and cloth. Octavo. Binding VG, with general wear and rubbing. Contents near fine with modest foxing and one ragged page. All plates present. Four fashion plates, three of which are hand-colored. Contributors include Poe (thirty contributions, including “The Mask of the Red Death” and his important sympathetic two-part review of Hawthorne’s “Twice Told Tales”), Bryant (three), Cooper (three), Longfellow (five, including his three-part “The Spanish Student”), and Lowell (six). $250

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Graham’s Lady’s and Gentleman’s Magazine of Literature and Art
Vol. 22, No. 1 (January 1843) to Vol. 23, No. 6 (December 1843), comprising a complete year of 12 issues. Bound in black quarter leather and cloth. Octavo. Binding VG, with general wear and rubbing. Contents near fine, with modest foxing. All plates present. Five fashion plates, two of which are hand-colored, and two hand-colored botanicals. Contributors include Bryant (two contributions), Cooper (ten, including the four-part “The Autobiography of a Pocket Handkerchief”), Longfellow (four), Lowell (four), and Poe (six, including “The Conqueror Worm”). $150

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Graham’s Magazine of Literature and Art
Vol. 26, No. 1 (January 1845) to Vol. 27, No. 6 (December 1845), comprising a complete year of twelve issues. Bound in decorated black full leather. Octavo. Binding scuffed, VG, front hinge starting at bottom. Contents near fine, without the usual foxing. All plates present. Seven beautiful American Indian plates after Bodmer and two hand-colored fashion plates. Contributors include Poe (two contributions, including his “The Imp of the Perverse”), Bryant (one), Cooper (three), Longfellow (seven), and Lowell (four, including an appreciation and full-page portrait of Poe). $150

A Complete Run in Wrappers

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Green Mountain Repository (Burlington, VT)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1832) to No. 12 (December 1832), a complete run, in wrappers. Octavos. First issue front wrapper toned, one issue with staining, two issues with archivally repaired spines, else near fine. The short-lived Green Mountain Repository was conceived and edited by Zadock Thompson (1796-1856), celebrated Vermont historian, naturalist, professor, and Episcopal priest, his two most important works being History of the State of Vermont (1833) and History of the State of Vermont, Natural, Civil and Statistical (1842). His magazine was a pleasant miscellany of history, both human and natural, practical information, technological advances, science, poetry, and commentary. Typical articles included: the typography of Vermont, the manufacture of glass beads, the biography of Gov. Chittenden, comets, railroads, lithographic prints, origins of the war between the Iroquis and Algonquins, etc. etc. $200

With the Rare Tissue Patterns Bound In

Harper’s Bazar (New York)
Harper’s Bazar, the third periodical from the House of Harper, was like its sisters, Harper’s Monthly and Harper’s Weekly, an immediate success. It set the standard for the 19th century weekly fashion magazine. Within ten years, Mott tells us, it reached the solid circulation of 80,000 and stayed there for more than a decade. Its editor, Mary Booth, was a historian, a translator, and a woman of discrimination. Though the fashion plates were picked up from European journals, much of the rest of the content of Harper’s Bazar was original and distinctive, including art by Thomas Nast, Winslow Homer, and other leading illustrators of the day, and fiction by Willkie Collins, Justin McCarthy, and other popular writers. Each of the volumes below contain the elusive tissue patterns, which were published as supplements with every other issue throughout the nineteenth century, but rarely found preserved. Periodyssey offers the following volumes:

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Harper’s Bazar. Vol. 13, No. 1 (January 3, 1880) to No. 52 (December 25, 1880), comprising 52 issues. Folio. Bound in the publisher’s decorated green cloth. Binding near fine. Light edge wear to spine ends and tips. Contents near fine. Title-page and index bound in. Profusely illustrated. Contains 21 of the 23 tissue patterns called for. $500

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Harper’s Bazar. Vol. 15, No. 1 (January 7, 1882) to No. 52 (December 30, 1882), comprising 52 issues. Folio. Bound in publisher’s decorated green cloth. Binding near fine. Light edge wear to spine ends and tips. Contents VG+, with some small tears. Title-page and index bound in. Profusely illustrated. Contains all 23 of the tissue patterns called for. Also contains thirteen Nast drawings, two related to Christmas and three related to Oscar Wilde. $500

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Harper’s Bazar. Vol. 16, No. 1 (January 6, 1883) to No. 52 (December 29, 1883), comprising 52 issues. Folio. Bound in the publisher’s decorated green cloth. Binding near fine. Light edge wear to spine ends and tips. Contents near fine. Title-page and index bound in. Profusely illustrated. Contains 22 of the 25 tissue patterns called for. Also contains six Nast drawings, three of which are related to Christmas. $500

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Harper’s Weekly Newspaper Magazine Nast Santa Election 1880
This is Volume 24 of Harper’s Weekly containing No. 1201 (January 3, 1880) to No. 1252 (December 25, 1880), comprising 52 issues, bound in black leather and brown cloth. Folio. Binding VG+, with scuffing and edge wear. Contents near fine. Doublespreads tipped in. Highlights include 1880 presidential campaign coverage, one hundred and twenty Thomas Nast cartoons, and full- and doublespread plates by AB Frost, Bernhard Gillam, and Howard Pyle. Harper’s Weekly is surely the most famous and probably the most important nineteenth century magazine. It is loaded with significant and beautiful woodcuts that chronicle all aspects of the life of the period. Initially, it was devoid of controversy or opinion; the publishers apparently didn’t want to alienate a single potential subscriber. But with the advent of the Civil War, the editorship of GW Curtis (1863-92), and the cartoons of Thomas Nast (1862-1886), Harper’s Weekly metamorphosed into one of the great journals of opinion, as well as being a distinguished source of news. Added to that are the many important contributors of graphics and prose, chief among them being Winslow Homer, A. Conan Doyle, Frederic Remington, H. G. Wells, and Maxfield Parrish, spread throughout the run from first to last. Mott sums up the value of the magazine this way: “The old files of Harper’s Weekly are a delight to the casual reader and a rich treasury for the historical investigator.” (Mott/II/469). $500

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The International Review Magazine Complete Run Henry Cabot Lodge 1874-83
This is a complete run of 14 volumes of The International Review, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1874) to Vol. 14 (June 1883), comprising 82 issues, bound in 14 volumes of cloth spines with leather spine labels and marble paper-covered boards. Octavos. Bindings near fine with small paper library labels to spines. Contents near fine with old library pockets on rear paste-downs. Despite the implication of its name, The International Review was primarily a critical review, like The North American Review, not a journal of politics. As such, its contributors included Henry James, Jr., Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, William Cullen Bryant, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Greenleaf Whittier, Sydney Lanier, Brander Matthews, and, from abroad, Sir Edwin Arnold, P. G. Hamerton, and Justin McCarthy. Topics of interest included Deep Sea Exploration, Transcendentalism in New England, Reminiscences of Alexander Stephens, current controversies of the day, both political and academic, and profiles of Poe, Longfellow, and Bryant, among many. As Mott says, “The contents were varied, with good articles on literature and art, and some belle-lettres. Book reviews were given special attention.” Founded by John Leavitt as a bimonthly, it became a monthly publication when John Morse and Henry Cabot Lodge became editors in 1879. Robert Porter and William Balch were the final editors. A nice set of a distinguished though short-lived periodical. $300

Henry James Classic Novella, Complete in Parts

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Henry James. “The Aspern Papers” in The Atlantic Monthly, March, April, and May, 1888. Octavos. Wrappers to March and May are near fine, with chipping to top and bottom of spine paper. Front wrapper to April is VG- with spotting and chipping to the spine. Contents near fine. $300
          The Aspern Papers is James’ unforgettable story about an unnamed historian in search of the Aspern Papers, letters written by the great poet Aspern (modelled after Shelley) to his now ancient lover. In an effort to obtain the letters, the historian travels to Venice and through subterfuge ingratiates himself to Aspern’s old lover. For anyone who treasures the past, the story is an unforgettable thriller and the ending crushing. James thought so highly of the story that he put it first in volume 12 of The New York Edition, ahead of even The Turn of the Screw. Critics, with near unanimity, have agreed with him about the tale’s high quality. Leon Edel wrote, “The story moves with the rhythmic pace and tension of a mystery story; and the double climax … gives this tale … high drama.”

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Journal of the American Medical Association AMA Bound Run 1883-87
This is a bound run of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Vol. 1, No. 1 (July 14, 1883) to Vol. 9, No. 27 (December 31, 1887), comprising 234 weekly issues, bound in nine volumes of matching black leather and marbled boards. Quartos. Bindings VG, with modest wear. Contents near fine. The venerable Journal of the American Medical Association, now referred to simply as JAMA, was founded in 1883 by the AMA and edited in its first five years by the great Doctor Nathan Smith Davis, Sr. (1817-1904). This run encompasses nearly all of the issues that he edited. Davis, born in upstate New York, became a doctor at the age of 20, and soon moved his practice to New York City. He complimented his practice with research and soon gained attention for his scholarship. As a member of the Society of the State of New York, he issued a report in 1845 as chairman of the Committee on Correspondence relative to Medical Education and Examination that led to the organization of the American Medical Association. In 1849, he accepted the chair of physiology and pathology at Rush Medical College in Chicago. When he was opposed in his efforts to reform educational standards there, he founded the Chicago Medical College, of which he was for more than forty years the dean and professor of principles and practice of medicine. In 1855 he became editor of the Chicago Medical Journal, and five years later the Chicago Medical Examiner, remaining with these journals for twenty years. In the mid-1860s, he served two terms as president of the AMA. It was chiefly through his efforts that the AMA launched the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1883. He was its first editor and continued in that position for five years. Each issue of the Journal contained reports of advances in the field, news of the profession, minutes of meetings and transcripts of addresses, book reviews, editorials, and letters. Few men did more than Davis in wresting the field of medicine from the quacks of the 19th century and transforming it into the highly respected profession it is today. $500

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Journal of the Military Service Institution of the United States (New York)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1880) to Vol. 2, No. 8 (October 1881), comprising the first eight issues bound in two volumes of brown leather and cloth. Octavos. Bindings VG, with edge wear. Contents near fine. These volumes are from the library of William C. Church, the editor and publisher of The Army and Navy Journal, with his name stamped at the bottom of the spines. The Military Service Institution of the United States was a voluntary organization initiated by Generals W. T. Sherman and Philip Sheridan for the mutual improvement of officers of the Army. The Institution was founded in 1878, held its first meeting in 1879, and published the first issue of the Journal in 1880. The Journal’s editorial purpose was to disseminate the most advanced studies on the science and art of war and to promote solidarity among officers in far-flung posts. Each issue featured essays on the latest thinking, innovations, and inventions on the science and art of war, republication of important addresses, book reviews, correspondence, obituaries, and news of the Institution. Highlights of these volumes include a long series by Sherman on military law, artillery in the Far East by Brevet Major J. P. Sanger, Arctic experiences by Lieutenant F. Schwatka, and five essays on the “Indian Question.” The Journal was published for nearly forty years, but it, like the Institution itself, did not long survive its founders, folding, somewhat ironically, during World War I. $250

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Journal of Applied Microscopy Bausch Lomb Optical Magazine 1898 Vol. 1
This is Vol. 1 of The Journal of Applied Microscopy containing No. 1 (January 1898) to No. 12 (December 1898) comprising 12 issues in all, the complete first year, bound in the publisher’s black cloth. Octavo. Binding VG+. Contents near fine. The Journal of Applied Microscopy was a short-lived monthly (ceased in 1903) published by the venerable firm of Bausch and Lomb. Courtesy Wikipedia, Bausch & Lomb was founded in 1853 by John Jacob Bausch and Henry C. Lomb in Rochester, New York. A trained optician, Bausch found in Lomb the financier and partner he needed for a small but ambitious workshop producing monocles. In 1861, the company began manufacturing Vulcanite rubber eyeglass frames and other precision vision products. During the American Civil War, the Union blockade caused the price of gold and European horn to rise dramatically. This resulted in a growing demand for Bausch & Lomb spectacles made from Vulcanite. In 1876, the company began manufacturing microscopes. Later that year, the Bausch & Lomb Optical Company won a distinction at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition. The company also produced photographic lenses (1883), spectacle lenses (1889), microtomes (1890), and binoculars and telescopes (1893). Starting in 1892, in cooperation with Zeiss in Germany, the company produced optical lenses. In this manner, at the end of the 19th century, the product range included eyeglasses, microscopes and binoculars, projectors, camera lenses and camera diaphragms. The Journal was a scholarly magazine, intended to advance the science of microscopy. Its editor L. B. Elliott, explained in the first issue, that the Journal “will be a progressive record of … the uses of the microscope, improvements in apparatus and new applications of apparatus already existing, methods of working, new and useful formulae, … and news and notes about institutions and men here and abroad.” This is a seminal publication in the field. $150

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Kansas Magazine Walt Whitman Full Year 1872
This is the first year of the Kansas Magazine, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1872) to Vol. 2, No. 6 (December 1872), comprising the first twelve of twenty issues bound in two volumes of leather and cloth. Octavos. Binding edges worn, leather scuffed, generally VG. Contents near fine. Topeka, Kansas, binder’s ticket on front paste-down of each volume. The Kansas Magazine was a respectable though short-lived attempt at a general interest monthly on the frontier. Highlights include articles on Kansas Railroads; Native Americans, including profiles of specific tribes, folklore, descriptions of Indian war dances, and a three part series on western Indian missions; Civil War reminiscences; western fiction; and miscellaneous articles on Darwinism, the death penalty, Walt Whitman in Europe; and a profile of Artemus Ward, obviously written by someone who knew him personally. The literary significance of this volume is that it contains two Walt Whitman first appearance: the poems “The Mystic Trumpeter”(February 1872) and “Virginia — The West” (March 1872). Scarce. $300

Sarah Josepha Hale’s First Magazine

The Ladies Magazine (Boston)
The Ladies Magazine was founded in 1828 by Mrs. Sarah Josepha Hale, with the help of friends of her late husband, who took pity on the widow with five children. Mrs. Hale, it turns out, was more than equal to the task, become one of the great female editors of the 19th century. While her magazine was full of the sentimentality that characterized magazines of the period directed at the weaker sex, it distinguished itself as an early and outspoken advocate for the education of women. And she gathered about her several other extraordinary women who shared in her cause, notably Lydia Maria Child, then editing the Juvenile Miscellany to the same purpose, Lydia Sigourney, and Catherine Sedgewick. Mott doubts the magazine ever prospered, but it put Mrs. Hale in the spotlight. When Louis Godey bought the monthly in 1836 to merge it with his Godey’s Lady’s Book, he bought the services of Mrs. Hale as well and she continued as an outspoken advocate for her gender for forty more years. Periodyssey offers the following volumes:

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1833. Vol. 6, No. 1 (January 1833) to No. 12 (December 1833), bound in full leather. Octavo. Binding good, well worn with some bowing. Contents VG with foxing. Features four bright hand-colored fashion plates and two other plates. $125

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1834. Vol. 7, No. 1 (January 1834) to No. 12 (December 1834), bound in leather and cloth. Octavo. Binding good, well worn. Contents VG with foxing and one page sprung. Features five plates, including an early view of the “President’s House”. $125

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The Lark (San Francisco)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (May 1895) to Vol. 2, No. 24 (April 1897) comprising 24 issues in all, the complete run, along with the Epilark, an “intimate history of the Lark,” published in May 1897, bound in two volumes of decorated cloth by the publisher. Small octavos. Bindings near fine with spotting. Surprisingly little edge wear. Contents VG, printed on bamboo paper. The Lark has the distinction of being the first magazine in America devoted to nonsense. It can’t be said that it was a reaction to the famous humor magazines of the day (which took themselves rather seriously) because that would imply that the Lark had a mission. It’s only purpose was to provide an outlet for the whimsies of its creators, chief among them Gelett Burgess, with help from Carolyn Wells, Maynard Dixon, Florence Lundberg, Ernest Peixotto, and Bruce Porter. It was a very high level of whimsy, however. Mott got it right when he said, “The Lark was unique in its high spirits and its freshness; and was as clever as the best of the [little magazines of the 1890’s] — one of the most charming magazines ever published.” (Mott/IV/388) In its pages, the country was first introduced to Burgess’ antic humor, including the immortal lines: “I never saw a purple cow/I never hope to see one/But I can tell you anyhow/I’d rather see than be one.” (which appeared in the first issue) and the equally wonderful sequel: “Ah, yes, I wrote the Purple Cow/I’m sorry now I wrote it/But I can tell you anyhow/I’ll kill you if you quote it.” (final issue). Burgess and his co-conspirators went off to lead interesting and productive lives in the arts. But nothing they did or anyone else has done since quite matched the originality of the Lark. $250

A Complete Run of Jean-Louis Forain’s Weekly

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Le Fifre (Paris)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (February 23, 1889) to No. 15 (June 1, 1889), a complete run, bound along with special issues of Nos Humoristes (1900), Les Hommes du Jour (1910), and Figaro Illustre (1902), each devoted entirely to Forain’s work. Folio. Bound in red cloth and marbled boards. Binding VG+, with fading to cloth. Contents near fine. Jean-Louis Forain (1852-1931) was already a respected Impressionist when he launched his own comic weekly in 1889. Each issue of Le Fifre (The Fife) featured two full-page illustrations by Forain augmented with text by Forain, Emile André, Champigneulles, Paul Hervieu, Jean Richepin, Aurelien Scholl, and Armand Silvestre. The weekly did not last, but Forain’s success as an artist was assured. Even his virulent anti-Semitic caricatures in PSST… ten years later did not affect his standing as one of the most important social satirists of his era. A great set. $500

The Raven’s Second Appearance

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Literary Emporium (New York)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (January-February 1845) to No. 6 (November-December 1845), comprising six bi-monthly issues, one year, bound in publisher’s elaborately decorated leather. Octavo. Binding VG+, with edge wear. Contents near fine, with the usual foxing. J.K. Wellman conceived his Literary Emporium as an annual in the making. So while it presented as a bi-monthly magazine in wrappers, once it was bound it resembled a gift book. This, the first year of the Literary Emporium (it lasted two more), features six hand-colored botanicals, six steel engravings, and a host of literary miscellany, the most noteworthy of which is the very last entry, Poe’s “Raven”, which fills the final few pages of the November issue (and was published sometime in October). This constitutes the second periodical appearance of “The Raven” – the first being in the January 1845 issue of the American Whig Review – but it is the first time it appeared under Poe’s name. Though not scarce, the Literary Emporium is difficult to find in nice condition. $500

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The Manhattan New York Monthly Magazine Complete Run Bound 1883-84
This is a complete run of The Manhattan, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1883) to Vol. 4, No. 3 (September 1884), comprising a total of twenty-one issues, twelve of which are bound in two volumes of black leather and cloth and nine of which are in original wrappers. Octavos. Bound issues: VG+ bindings with near fine contents. Title pages bound in. Index to volume 2 bound in. Wrappered issues: VG+ wrappers with near fine contents. Darkening to most spines. The Manhattan was begun by the venerable New York printer John Orr as an umbrella literary organ for fraternal societies — the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Knights of Honor, the Royal Arcanum, and others — and the first issue devoted two dozen pages to them. However, when the societies did not respond with the enthusiasm that Orr had hoped for their place in the contents shrunk and by the fifth issue was abandoned entirely. From then on The Manhattan was a general interest monthly in the mold of its fat and prosperous competitor, The Century. It published high quality period fiction and poetry and had a very respectable critical department. Highlights from these issues include “Artemus Ward in New Orleans,” “The Noble Red Man in Brazil,” travelogues of the St. Johns and Hackensack rivers, a serialized novel by Julian Hawthorne, an article by Cornelius Mathews chastising Charles Dickens as a shameless self-promoter, an article on Western Scenery illustrated by Thomas Moran, and more. The issues grew in size through the run and the magazine appeared to be prospering. But that was not the case. The competition was simply too great. The Manhattan ceased publishing with the September 1884 issue. $400

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Maryland Historical Magazine Bound Run 1906-07
This is a two-year run of the Maryland Historical Magazine from Vol. 1, No. 1 (March 1906) to Vol. 2, No. 4 (December 1907), comprising the first eight issues, bound in two volumes of contemporary red cloth. Octavos. Bindings near fine, contents near fine. The Maryland Historical Society has published the Maryland Historical Magazine continuously for more than 110 years. The first two volumes are representative of the magazines aims and aspirations, They contain articles profiling famous people (various Calverts, William Clairborne), important families (Brooke, Tilden, Lowndes), moments in military history (the battle of Bladensburg, the Sharpsburg campaign), general history (early missions among the Indians, transported convict labor in colonial Maryland) personal history (Reminiscences of Baltimore in 1824), streuctural history (A Bohemia Manor, the stained glass in the Annapolis state house), important documents and letters, and more. A nice set filled with valuable regional history. $100

E. Gordon Craig’s Tour de Force

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The Mask (Florence, Italy)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (1908) to Vol. 3, No. 10-12 (April 1911), comprising 12 monthly issues and eight quarterly issues, bound in three volumes in the publisher’s binding of cloth-covered spines and paper-covered boards. Small folios. Bindings fair/VG, with edge wear and soiling, especially to the first volume, which has been rebacked in cloth with the original spine label laid down. Bookplate to front pastedown and embossing stamp to first title page of each volume. All covers and advertising pages bound in. Theater historian Olga Taxidou has written: “No study of modern theater is complete without a thorough understanding of the enormous influence of visionary genius Edward Gordon Craig. Born in England in 1872, Craig went on to become famous world-wide as an actor, manager, director, playwright, designer, and most importantly an author and theorist, whose books were translated into German, Russian, Japanese, Dutch, Hungarian, and Danish.” The Mask, Craig’s most important sustained work (1908-29) was used by him to attack commercial theater and to articulate a modern theater rooted in aesthetics. At its most elemental, Craig advocated for a theater that combined innovative staging and lighting with acting to project a new form of art that would change the audience’s experience from one that was primarily audible to one that was more holistic. He chose the title of his magazine to evoke classic theater. But it was also intended as a wink to his readership because most of the articles were written by Craig using as many as sixty pseudonyms, which he did not admit to until 1962. This then makes the magazine a tour-de-force. While all of the volumes of The Mask are handsome productions, the first three volumes are the only ones in folio, making them especially appealing, with their wide margins, elegant typography, and sumptuous Italian paper. $1,200

“… To those who breathe freely only in limitless space…”

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Mother Earth (New York)
In the first issue of Mother Earth (1906-17), Emma Goldman, editor and publisher, waxed poetic: “Mother Earth will endeavor to attract and appeal to all those who oppose encroachment on public and individual life. It will appeal to those who strive for something higher, weary of the commonplace; to those who feel that stagnation is a deadweight on the firm and elastic step of progress; to those who breathe freely only in limitless space; to those who long for the tender shade of a new dawn for a humanity free from the dread of want, the dread of starvation in the face of mountains of riches. The Earth free for the free individual!” It was an indication that the magazine would strive to be something more than a journal of agit-prop, that it would speak to the soul. Goldman, and later Alexander Berkman, who edited the magazine from 1907 to 1915, filled the magazine with intelligent, radical observations and appeals. They were assisted by a stellar list of contributors, a virtual “who’s who” of the radical left in the United States in the years prior to World War I: Margaret Anderson, Maxwell Bodenheim, Louise Bryant, Padraic Colum, Floyd Dell, Mabel Dodge, Will Durant, William Z. Foster, Sadakichi Hartmann, Hippolyte Havel, Ben Hecht, Robert Henri, Élisée Reclus, and Margaret Sanger, among many. Subject matter in the magazine ranged over a variety of topics including the labor movement, education, literature and the arts, state and government control, women’s emancipation, sexual freedom, and birth control. In 1917, in the pages of Mother Earth, Goldman encouraged resistance to the draft. For this she was arrested, imprisoned, put on trial, and then deported. Mother Earth is the best known and most interesting anarchist publication even produced in the United States. Periodyssey offers the following issues:

Mother Earth, December 1912. 12mo. Covers VG+. Contents near fine. $100

Mother Earth, August 1913. 12mo. Covers VG+. Contents near fine, with toning to page 1. $100

Mother Earth, September 1913. 12mo. Contents VG with puncture through entire issue. $50

Mother Earth, December 1913. 12mo. Covers VG+. Contents near fine. $100

Mother Earth, March 1914. 12mo. Covers VG+. Contents near fine. $100

Mother Earth, June 1916. 12mo. Covers VG+, with 2″ split to top of spine. Contents near fine. $100

Mother Earth, April 1917. 12mo. Covers VG+. Contents near fine. $100

A Complete Run of “a Brave, Truthful Magazine”

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Pagany (Boston/New York/Bethel and Redding, Connecticut)
Vol. 1 No. 1 (Winter 1930) to Vol. 3, No. 4 (Fall/Winter 1933), comprising 12 issues, a complete run, in original wraps. Octavos. All VG or better. Hoffman et al write, “The value of Richard Johns’ Pagany lies in the great consciousness of itself as a literary magazine, freed from all commercial pressures. One of its most valuable contributions is to modern American fiction.” Contributors included Erskine Caldwell, William Carlos Williams, John Dos Passos, James T. Farrell, Edward Dahlberg, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Kenneth Rexroth, Conrad Aiken, and many others. Dahlberg said of Pagany, “In my lifetime I know of no magazine to compare it with… It was a brave, truthful magazine, and the editor was willing to take poems, parcels of novels, stories, and essays without bothering about that whore, reputation.” Albert Halper said of Pagany, “It was rich in offerings, chock full of good writing, and laced with youth.” And finally, Erskine Caldwell declared that Pagany “was the most important little literary magazine edited and published in the United States during the Thirties.” Complete runs are difficult to assemble, especially in nice condition. $500

Stephen Crane in your Pocket

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Stephen Crane in Pocket Magazine (New York)
A collection of eight issues of this elusive monthly, published in New York from 1895 to 1901, each containing a short story by Stephen Crane. 12mos. Generally near fine, some issues whiter than others, spines with light wear. June 1896 cover with light quarter-sized stain to front wrapper. The July 1897 issue good only, with well-rubbed wrappers and a chipped spine. Only one issue, October 1896, which contains “A Detail”, is lacking for a complete set. The issues include:

April 1896: “A Tale of Mere Chance” (first American magazine appearance);
May 1896: “A Grey Sleeve” (first American magazine appearance);
June 1896: “One Dash – Horses” (first American magazine appearance);
August 1896: “The Snake” (first appearance);
September 1896: “An Indiana Campaign” (first appearance);
November 1896: “The Voice of the Mountain” (first appearance);
June 1897: “How the Donkey Lifted the Hills” (first appearance);
July 1897: “A Victory of the Moon” (first appearance).

Also included in the collection is a window poster for the May 1896 issue, which is an enlarged version of the cover, in fine condition. A difficult collection to assemble, particularly in this condition. $500/lot

The Complete Third Series

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Polyanthos (Boston)
Third series, Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 1812) through Vol. 4, No. 6 (September 1814), comprising twenty-four numbers, a complete third series, bound in four volumes of matching black leather and marbled boards. Octavos. Bindings VG, though the leather on the first two volumes has aged poorly. Contents VG with foxing, sometimes heavy. Two of the volumes have a sample front wrapper bound into the rear. The first two series of the Polyanthos were 18mos, in other words, tiny magazines. Near the end of 1812, Joseph Buckingham enlarged the magazine and improved it. In his memoirs, he wrote: “My first attempt to amuse, instruct, and edify the public, was the publication of Polyanthos.” The magazine was well-illustrated at a time when engravings were exceedingly expensive. Each issue featured a biography of a famous person, with an engraved portrait, most of which Buckingham wrote himself. Many of the biographies were of American naval heroes. As Neil Edgar wrote: “Buckingham had an eye on a wide audience and tried to capture one by including an occasional Mirror of Fashion, Lectures on Natural Philosophy, the Moral Censor, brief scientific notes on discoveries and inventions, letters on mythology, a monthly dramatic review, music and the inevitable miscellany.” This editorial policy set the Polyanthos apart for the other early American periodicals, which larded their contents with official reports and speeches, making it a distinctive and charming magazine. $300

A Complete Run of the Anti-Dreyfus Weekly 

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PSST…! (Paris)
Vol. 1 No. 1 (February 5, 1898) to No. 85 (September 16, 1899), comprising 85 issues, a complete run, handsomely rebacked in dark blue leather with original marbled boards. Folio. Binding VG+, with light edge wear. Contents near fine. This is a complete run of Jean-Louis Forain and Caran D’Ache’s highly inflammatory anti-Dreyfus periodical. Psst…!, a weekly, was created specifically as a rallying point against the Alfred Dreyfus Affair. It contains no text, only black and white cartoons (and captions in French) from the pens of Forain and Caran D’Ache, two of the greatest French caricaturists of their day. Our colleague, Historicana, describes the volume thus: “The Dreyfus Affair was an explosive, pivotal moment in the history of France’s Third Republic. For all of her liberte, egalite, fraternite, France was revealed to be rife with the same unfounded bigotry towards Jews as other less enlightened nations. Opposing camps of Dreyfusards and anti-Dreyfusards settled in as the long political ordeal raged through, not only, French courtrooms, kitchens and marketplaces but the drawing rooms of the outside world as well. This public interest in the Dreyfus conflagration was a 19th century equivalent to the O.J. Trial! Everyone had an opinion. Psst…! represented the stiletto sharp but badly mislead reiteration of Dreyfus’ guilt. This magazine’s unswerving aim was clearly based on preserving the respect and power of the French army and not in establishing who really passed military secrets to the German attaché. Widely read during its brief life Psst…! even provoked the creation of another weekly magazine Le Sifflet which sought to maintain Dreyfus’ innocence. This is propaganda distilled to its purest form, directed at the emotions, without words to complicate the reader’s mental clarity. It was this type of literature and its compelling anti-Semitic position that prompted Theodor Herzl’s call for a Jewish Homeland, as well as Emile Zola’s famous burst of intellectual outrage.” This is the publisher’s special edition, printed on Japanese paper and limited to 75 copies. $400

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Putnam’s Monthly Complete Run 1906-1910 Henry James Don Marquis Gelett Burgess
This is a complete seven-volume run of Putnam’s Monthly, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 1906) to Vol. 7, No. 7 (April 1910), comprising 43 issues bound in brown cloth with leather spine labels. Octavos. Bindings VG; contents VG, with an occasional library stamp. This third attempt by the publishing house of Putnam to establish an organ was built on the ashes of the highly esteemed Critic (1881-1906), which the Putnams had owned since 1898. As such, Putnam’s Monthly was much concerned about literature, but also broader — a general interest monthly in the spirit of Scribner’s Magazine or The Century. It was edited by the sister and brother team of Jeanette and Joseph Gilder, the erudite team that had guided the Critic. They attracted many talents to the pages of the Monthly: Henry James, Maurice Maeterlinck, Count Zeppellin, Brander Matthews, Don Marquis, Carolyn Wells, Everett Shinn, and Gelett Burgess, among many. The magazine is especially valuable for its well-illustrated profiles of writers and artists, both contemporary and from the past. Unlike Putnam’s predecessors, this series met with success, achieving a circulation of 120,000. But it was so expensive to produce that 120,000 subscribers wasn’t enough. The house of Putnam’s never again attempted a magazine. $300

“A Significance… Unapproached in Kind and Effect by Any Other Periodical”

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Scientific American/Scientific American Supplement (New York)
January 3, 1880, to December 31, 1881. Four volumes each of Scientific American (volumes 42-45) and Scientific American Supplement (volumes 9-12), a total of 206 out of 208 issues (lacking the April 10, 1880, and the June 25, 1881 issues of Scientific American), bound in three volumes of mismatching leather and cloth. Small folios. Bindings VG, with general wear. Contents near fine. From January 1880 to June 1881, the issues are interleaved. From July to December 1881, the issues are bound one volume after the other. $200
          Scientific American was founded in 1845 as a weekly and remained such until 1921, when it converted to monthly publication, which continues today. The issues from the nineteenth century are loaded with drawings and articles about new inventions and any other news befitting the “Advocate of Industry,” as it called itself. These volumes chronicle the unprecedented growth of America’s industrial capabilities and the blossoming of the American entrepreneurial spirit. As a journal of record for American patents, it is not an exaggeration to say that Scientific American played an important, perhaps crucial, role in stimulating the industrialization transformation. Highlights from its long run include news of the invention of the light bulb, the phonograph, the telephone, the motion picture camera, the personal camera, the type-writer, the x-ray, and much more. As Mott says, “The Scientific American had a significance — at least for its first sixty or seventy years — unapproached in kind and effect by any other periodical.” (Mott/II/324). In 1876 the wealth of technical information associated with the exhibits at the Philadelphia Centennial prompted the publishers to issue the Scientific American Supplement, which was identical in size and appearance to its parent paper. It proved so successful that it was continued after the fair closed for 43 years. Though it is sometimes difficult to distinguish one from the other, the Supplement contained less news and more technical information and pure science than did its parent. It’s unusual to find the two titles bound together but they serve as an interest gloss on one another.

Alberto Vargas in Shadowland

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Shadowland. March 1923. Small folio. VG+ covers, near fine interior. Features Vargas’ full-page color portrait of Nita Naldi, a color art deco cover by Hopfmuller, and a profile of artist Charles Sheeler. $75

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Shadowland. May 1923. Small folio. VG+ covers, near fine interior. Features Vargas’ full-page color portrait of Doris Kenyon, a color art deco cover by Hopfmuller, and a profile of artist Charles Prendergast. $75

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Harriet Beecher Stowe / Atlantic Monthly Oldtown Fireside Stories 1870
This is a complete serialization of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Oldtown Fireside Stories” in Atlantic Monthly, June through August, October through December 1870. Octavos. Original wrappers. Near Fine. Complete in six parts. Six Stowe short stories, which were collected into book form in 1871. A beautiful set. $175

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Sunset Magazine Pacific Monthly 1906-07 Maynard Dixon Ed Borein
This is a complete six-month volume of Sunset Magazine, from Vol. 18, No. 1 (November 1906) to No. 6 (April 1907), comprising six issues, bound in green cloth. Octavo. Binding VG, with some mottling to cloth. Contents near fine, with a library stamp to the cover of the November issue. Enhanced considerably by the rare presence of all covers and advertisements bound in. Index bound in. Highlights include two color covers by Maynard Dixon, a meditation (“The Singing of the West”) written and illustrated by Dixon, a frontispieces by Dixon, and a frontispiece by Ed. Borein. Begun in 1898 as a promotional monthly for the wonders of the Southwest by the Southern Pacific Railroad, Sunset quickly grew into a well illustrated general interest monthly, far surpassing the modest vision of its projectors. David Starr Jordan, John Muir, and Charles Warren Stoddard led the list of non-fiction contributors, who wrote on a wide variety of subjects, from world affairs to California history. Though fiction and poetry had its place in Sunset from the start, they took up more space and greater luster beginning with the editorship of Charles Sedgwick Aiken (1901-10). Contributors included Jack London, Owen Wister, Mary Austin, Stewart Edward White, Gelett Burgess, Bret Harte, Sinclair Lewis, and others. The magazine absorbed Pacific Monthly in 1912, cementing its status as the leading monthly of the west coast. In 1914, long after it had transcended its initial purpose as a barker for the attractions of the southwest, the Southern Pacific sold the magazine to its editors. The early covers were photographic. Under Aiken, they became more colorful, depicting scenes from the Southwest, old and new. At the end of 1928, on the verge of bankruptcy, Sunset was sold to the Lane family, who transformed it from a general interest magazine into “the magazine of southern living,” in which form it prospers today. $200

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Sunset Magazine Pacific Monthly 1907-08 Jack London Ed Borein Mary Austin
This is a complete six-month volume of Sunset Magazine, from Vol. 20, No. 1 (November 1907) to No. 6 (April 1908), comprising six issues, bound in green cloth. Octavo. Binding VG, with some mottling to cloth. Contents near fine, some wear to covers. A library stamp to the cover of the November issue. Enhanced considerably by the rare presence of all covers and advertisements bound in. Highlights include a short story (“That Spot”) by Jack London, a beautiful color cover by Ed. Borein, a frontispiece by Borein, an essay (“Some Literary Myths”) by Mary Austin, a poem (“Pabalita Sandoval”) by Damon Runyon, several poems by George Sterling, and a panoramic fold-out view of the new San Francisco by H. C. Tibbitts. Begun in 1898 as a promotional monthly for the wonders of the Southwest by the Southern Pacific Railroad, Sunset quickly grew into a well illustrated general interest monthly, far surpassing the modest vision of its projectors. David Starr Jordan, John Muir, and Charles Warren Stoddard led the list of non-fiction contributors, who wrote on a wide variety of subjects, from world affairs to California history. Though fiction and poetry had its place in Sunset from the start, they took up more space and greater luster beginning with the editorship of Charles Sedgwick Aiken (1901-10). Contributors included Jack London, Owen Wister, Mary Austin, Stewart Edward White, Gelett Burgess, Bret Harte, Sinclair Lewis, and others. The magazine absorbed Pacific Monthly in 1912, cementing its status as the leading monthly of the west coast. In 1914, long after it had transcended its initial purpose as a barker for the attractions of the southwest, the Southern Pacific sold the magazine to its editors. The early covers were photographic. Under Aiken, they became more colorful, depicting scenes from the Southwest, old and new. At the end of 1928, on the verge of bankruptcy, Sunset was sold to the Lane family, who transformed it from a general interest magazine into “the magazine of southern living,” in which form it prospers today. $200

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Vanity Fair (New York)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (December 28, 1859) to Vol. 7, No. 169 (July 4, 1863), comprising 169 issues, a complete run, bound in five volumes of leather and marbled boards. Quartos. The first four volumes are VG+ in matching black leather and bound by the half year and the last three volumes are VG- in brown leather and bound together in one. Contents generally fine. Usually, volume two and most of volume three are not found with covers bound in since the covers repeated during this period, but this set not only has the covers bound in but also the unnumbered advertising back covers, which were discontinued in May 1861. Vanity Fair is widely regarded as the best American humor magazine prior to Puck. It was edited at various periods by Charles Godfrey Leland and Charles Farrar Browne (“Artemus Ward”) and featured the political cartoons of HL Stephens. Vanity Fair is full of period humor that has aged gracefully, especially Ward’s contributions, but its cartoons are perhaps its most important feature. Stephens, who is more widely known today as a early American children’s book illustrator, drew political cartoons in the genteel mode of the British, but he could be savage when he chose to be. His series of caricatures of President Buchanan, for example, are merciless. He was impartial during the 1860 campaign but he became strongly pro-Union and nominally pro-Lincoln with the start of the Civil War. Many of his Lincoln cartoons in these volumes are classics and have been reprinted many times. Stephens’ work reveals the schizophrenic nature of the Union movement, because he was also a racist, despising the African-African and his Abolitionist advocates. These volumes contain a good number of ugly cartoons on the slave question. One of the high points of this set is the series of caricatures of famous people that Stephens drew for the covers of the magazine throughout much of 1862 and 1863. Personages caricatured include Henry Ward Beecher, William Cullen Bryant, Edwin P. Stanton, Benjamin Butler, William Lloyd Garrison, Gideon Welles, PT Barnum, Edwin Booth and a few dozen others. Vanity Fair switched to monthly publication in January 1863, suspended publication after the February issue, and then resumed as a weekly on May 2, only to fold for good on July 4. While the early volumes are fairly common, complete runs are scarce. $1,200

Verve (New York/Paris)
Though Verve was published in Paris, it can rightly be characterized as an American magazine as well, since its very existence was due to the encouragement and financial support of David Smart, publisher of Esquire and Apparel Arts.  With Smart’s no-strings attached money, Efstratios Teriade, former partner in the art book publishing house of Albert Skira and late editor of the Surrealist magazine, Minotaure, created one of the most lavish and cosmopolitan art journals ever.  The first issue perfectly expressed Teriade’s breadth of artistic vision, with lithographs by Matisse (cover), Leger, Miro, Rattner, and Bores; photographs by May Ray, Brassai, Cartier-Bresson, and Blumenfeld; and prose by Andre Gide, Georges Bataille, John Dos Passos, Andre Malraux, and Maurice Raynal.  Verve suffered with the advent of the war and never regained the eclectic quality that characterized its great issues of the thirties.  These copies are as fine as any we have handled.

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Verve #1. (December 1937) Cover lithograph by Matisse, lithographs by Leger, Miro, Rattner, Bores, photographs by Man Ray, prose by John Dos Passos. Fine.  $350

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Verve #2. (Spring 1938) Cover lithograph by Braque, lithographs by Kandinsky (two), Masson (two), prose by James Joyce and Ernest Hemingway. Fine.  $300

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Verve #3. (Summer 1938) Cover lithograph by Bonnard, lithographs by Klee, Miro, Chagall, and Rattner. Prose by Paul Velery, and Andre Malraux . Fine.   Less common than the other three.  $350

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Verve #4. (Fall 1938) Cover lithograph by Roulault, lithographs by Matisse (two), Derain (two), pen and ink drawings by Matisse, prose by Miro, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Federico Garcia Lorca. Fine.  $300

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Ware’s Valley Monthly St. Louis Magazine Bound Volume 1 1875
This is Ware’s Valley Monthly Vol. 1, No. 1 (May 1875) to No. 6 (October 1875), comprising the first six issues, bound in leather and cloth. Octavo. Binding VG, with edge wear. Contents near fine, with occasional light smudging. Ware’s Valley Monthly, “A Journal of Western Thought and Life,” was an ambitious attempt at a general interest monthly for the West. As such, it featured serialized fiction, poetry, editorial comment from a Western perspective, and other miscellany. It also devoted space to boosterism (“Summer Resorts in the West” , a two-part “Colorado: Its Attractions”, and “The Southwest and its Metropolis.”; American Indians (“The Comanches – An Ethnological Sketch”); and Civil War-related articles (a long review of Sherman’s memoirs, followed by another exploring Sherman’s attitudes about the laws of war, and a reminiscence of General Sterling Price). But publishing in 19th century America beyond the safe confines of the East Coast was always a risk and Ware’s Valley Monthly, despite a bright start, lasted only eighteen issues. $150