Recent Acquisitions

Here are some of our most RECENT ACQUISITIONS available for purchase:

The Thomas Nast of Portugal

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O António Maria (Lisbon)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (June 12, 1879) to Vol. 7, No. 3 (January 21, 1885), comprising 315 issues, a complete run, bound in six volumes of contemporary red cloth. Small folio. Near fine inside and out. Volumes 2 through 7 begin with a color title page and two chromolithographic cartoons. Volume 7 contains three full-page chromolithographic caricatures in the style of Vanity Fair. The rest of the issues feature black and white lithographs. $3,600
          O António Maria was Portugal’s first great political satire magazine, directed by Portugal’s first great political cartoonist Rafael Bordalo Pinheiro (1846-1905). The title, meant as an exclamation, expropriated the first half of the name of the reigning Portuguese Prime Minister, António Maria Fontes Pereira. Like Puck, O António Maria usually devoted its first, last, and center pages to cartoons. The text pages also were dotted with cartoon art. Among the contributors were the poet Guilherme de Azevedo (“João Rialto”), Ramalho Ortigão (“João Ribaixo”), Alfredo Morais Pinto (“Pan-Tarantula”), João Broa, Emílio Pimentel, Enrique Casanova, António Ramalho, Ribeiro Cristino, Columbano Bordalo Pinheiro, Manuel Gustavo and others. Initially the magazine struck a balance between cartoons and text, but as it matured, the text took a subservient position to cartoons and comic strips. Pinheiro used satire and irony in the pages of his magazine to oppose those in power and denounce the selfishness and corruption of the elites. All of Portugal’s leading politicians and heads of first families appeared in caricature at one time or another in the weekly. For all of its pungency, O António Maria never exceeded a regular circulation (that is, excepting the special issues) of 7,000. In 1884, the government revised the criminal code, which seriously limited freedom of the press. It was in this repressive environment, against which journalists generally adopted a passive attitude, that led Pinheiro in his final issue to explain: “When in a meeting of journalists’, I proposed an 18-day publishing moratorium to protest the shameful situation in which the Portuguese government has placed the Portuguese press, it was pointed out that O ANTÓNIO MARIA, as a weekly sheet, would not be seriously affected by the resolution. So I take the execution of my proposal one step further: O ANTÓNIO MARIA closes its doors forever in a sign of mourning.”


A Most Beautiful American Magazine, Complete

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Bradley, His Book (Springfield, MA)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (May 1896) to Vol. 2, No. 3 (February 1897), comprising seven issues in all, a complete run. Tall octavos/Quartos. VG+ with general light wear, a few chips to spines, and the usual chips to overhangs. $1,400
          Will Bradley was at the height of his fame when he decided to issue his own magazine. No other periodical better reflects the artistry of the 1890s than does Bradley, His Book. In fact, it is surely the most beautiful magazine produced up to its time. Each issue features dozens of pages of Bradley’s beautiful artwork, which adorns the covers, the contents, and the advertisements. They also contain attractively illustrated appraisals of the work of contemporary artists JC Leyendecker, Edward Penfield, Maxfield Parrish, and Ethel Reed, prose contributions from Bradley, Percival Pollard, Richard Harding Davis, and others, plus poetry and book reviews. Ulrich called BHB, “A fine monument to a great phase of the ‘modern’ book.” This is a lovely, legendary magazine. The only set on the internet right now is priced at $3,000.


The Civil War Begins

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper (New York)
Frank Leslie can rightly be called the father of American illustrated journalism. He apprenticed on the London Illustrated News, Gleason’s Pictorial Drawing Room Companion, and the Illustrated News of New York (1853) before establishing his own illustrated news weekly in December of 1855. It was an immediate hit because Leslie devised a system to print wood blocks of news events faster than had ever been done before. Like all successes, Leslie’s Newspaper spawned competitors, chief among them Harper’s Weekly. During the Civil War, the two were in a circulation war, which Harper’s Weekly eventually won. Leslie’s may never have been as august as Harper’s, but it traded the stature of the ages for the excitement of the moment – it was consistently livelier and less predictable than its stuffy contemporary. Every important event during the early years of the Civil War is here: the Heenan-Sayers fight, the arrival of envoys from Japan, the campaign of 1860 and the election of Abraham Lincoln, the secession of the South and formation of the Confederacy, Lincoln’s inauguration, the Fall of Sumter, the declarations of war, the great battles of Bull Run, Shiloh, the Peninsular Campaign, and Antietam. — much of it illustrated by a young Thomas Nast. In these volumes we see Leslie, the erstwhile engraver, create an unmatched visual feast: dozens of quadruple fold-outs and special war supplements. Finding all these large plates carefully bound in, rather than sewn through, which is usually the case, makes these volumes particularly precious. Periodyssey offers the following years:

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Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. Vol. 9, No. 214 (January 7, 1860) to Vol. 11, No. 266 (December 29, 1860), a total of 50 issues (January 14, May 5 and May 26 issues never bound in), bound in one volume. Binding poor, front board detached, spine badly chipped. Contents VG, clean, a few short tears, one marginal hole with loss. Frontispiece and index for volume 9 bound in. All double spreads bound in as foldouts, except two which are bound through. All seven quadruple spreads nicely folded in, two with archival repairs and slivers of loss, one with some crinkling. SOLD

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Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. Vol. 11, No. 267 (January 5, 1861) to Vol. 13, No. 318 (December 28, 1861), a total of 51 issues (October 19 issue never bound in), bound in one volume. Binding poor, boards nearly detached, spine badly worn. Contents VG, fresh, some small tears, soiling to two pages, archival repair to one. All double spreads bound in as foldouts, six with archival repairs and two of those with loss. All four quadruple spreads folded in, two of those still damaged with loss (including the map of the South), and the other laid in. SOLD

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Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. Vol. 13, No. 319 (January 4, 1862) to Vol. 15, No. 378 (December 27, 1862), a total of 60 issues, including the separately numbered War Supplements, bound in one volume. Binding poor, boards detached, spine mostly gone. Contents VG, clean, some small tears. All double spreads either tipped in or bound in as foldouts, two with archival repairs. All nine quadruple spreads present and folded in, two with archival repairs. SOLD


A Beautiful Art Deco Portrait

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Charles F. Quest. [Woman in hat and gloves]. (1930) Watercolor. Image size: 9” x 8”. Mat size: 19” x 18”. Near fine. $400
          This is a beautiful art deco portrait of a woman in hat and gloves, presumably for publication, by the illustrator, artist, and teacher Charles Francis Quest (1904-1993). Quest studied painting and sculpture for five years at the Washington University School of Fine Arts in St. Louis, earning both his Bachelor and Master Degrees of Fine Arts. After studying briefly in Europe, he made a career in the arts. In 1944, he returned to Washington University as a member of the faculty, where he taught until 1971. Quest painted murals for churches, schools, and other public buildings. He also worked in sculpture, stone carving, mosaic and stained glass, but is best known for his paintings and woodblock prints. His work is owned by at least forty-six museums in the United States and abroad, and has been exhibited in more than a hundred museums and galleries around the world. He had one-man exhibits at the Smithsonian Institution in 1951 and at the St. Louis City Art Museum in 1958. His papers and various works of art are housed at Georgetown University, in Washington, DC. A lovely piece.


The No. 1 Magazine for Yachtsmen

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The Rudder (New York)
The Rudder was published from 1891 to 1977. British-born Thomas Fleming Day (1861-1927) was working as a boat salesman for a shop on Dey Street in New York when his employer thought that “getting out a little paper” and charging for advertising space made more sense than producing all those free catalogs they were mailing out. Mr Day obliged. He turned out to be the perfect editor. An intrepid and experienced yachtsman, a fluid and opinionated writer, he steered the publication for three decades and made it the foremost magazine for the sailing crowd. In addition to travelogues and profiles of yachtsmen, the magazine was full of boat designs still of value today. Periodyssey offers the following volumes:

The Rudder. 1905. Volume 16, January to December, bound in the publisher’s light blue cloth. Binding VG+, general light wear. Contents near fine. Advertising, but not front and back covers, bound in. $250

The Rudder. 1906. Volume 17, January to December, bound in the publisher’s light blue cloth. Binding VG+, general light wear. Contents near fine. Advertising, but not front and back covers, bound in. $250

The Rudder. 1908. Volume 20, July to December, bound in the publisher’s light blue cloth. Binding VG-, faded, general light wear. Contents near fine. All covers and advertising bound in. $150


Sala Caricatures the Crystal Palace

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G. A. Sala. The Great Glass House Opend; the Exhibition Wot Is!! (London: 1851). Oblong octavo. VG,with edge wear and slight loss to last panel. Two panel hinges archivally reinforced. New spine and back cover. $425
          Anyone who knows the name of the 19th century personality, George Augustus Sala (1828-1895), undoubtedly thinks of him as a popular journalist, witty travel writer, indifferent novelist, and celebrated raconteur. So it may come as a surprise to learn that Sala first aspired to be an illustrator and comic artist. Throughout his teens and early twenties he earned his living as an apprentice to a miniature painter, an engraver, an illustrator, and a scene painter. In his spare time he also produced a pair of comic panoramas, mocking the Great Exhibition of 1851. In the first of the two, The Great Exhibit Wot Is To Be…, Sala made comical predictions of what the exhibition would be like. The second, The Great Glass House Opend; the Exhibit Wot Is!!, is a fully illustrated comic tour of the exhibition in 24 accordioned panels (that fold out to 216”) in which Sala pokes fun at Britain’s imperial pretensions, its view of foreigners, and the idea that the exhibition was a display of British superiority. It is a fine bit of satire, better and more pointed than the first. Unfortunately it was the last comic art from Sala’s pen. In August of that year Sala accidentally locked himself out of his flat and was forced to wander the streets of London all night with but nine pence in his pocket. The resulting article he wrote of the experience was constructed around his inability to find a place to sleep, the hardship of life on the streets of the capital, and the subsequent social commentary that entailed. He entitled it “The Key of the Street”. When Charles Dickens accepted it for his weekly journal, Household Words, and paid Sala an astonishing five pounds for it, the artist became a writer for good.


Living Large in Edwardian America

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Suburban Life (Boston)
Suburban Life, the most formidable competitor to Country Life, was founded in Boston in 1903 as The Suburban, an insubstantial black and white monthly. With new owners and an infusion of cash, it changed its name to Suburban Country Life in late 1904 (quickly dropping “Country” from its name to avoid confusion) and then simply Suburban Life in February 1905. Like its slightly more established and slightly more prosperous New York competitor, Suburban Life emphasized beautiful homes, house plans, decorating, landscaping, and gardening. Apparently the interest in these subjects was great enough to support two substantial magazines. In 1914 it changed its name to The Countryside Magazine and Suburban Life, and then with the war, was absorbed by the Independent, which had also recently absorbed Harper’s Weekly. While it lasted Suburban Life was a handsome, successful magazine. Periodyssey offers the following volumes:

Suburban Life. 1905. Volume 1, January to December, bound in one volumes of green cloth with leather spine labels. Binding worn, sturdy. Contents near fine, with covers and advertisements bound in. (The January issue is the last of the old series and is entitled Suburban County Life.) SOLD

Suburban Life. 1906. Volumes 2 and 3, January to December, bound in one volumes of green cloth with leather spine labels. Binding worn, sturdy. Contents near fine, with covers and advertisements bound in. SOLD

Suburban Life. 1908. Volumes 6 and 7, January to December, bound in one volumes of green cloth with leather spine labels. Binding worn, especially the top and bottom of spine, sturdy. Contents near fine, with covers and advertisements bound in. $125

Suburban Life. 1909. Volumes 8 and 9, January to December, bound in one volumes of green cloth with leather spine labels. Binding worn, tear to spine cloth, sturdy. Contents near fine, with covers and advertisements bound in. $125

Suburban Life. 1910. Volumes 10 and 11, January to December, bound in one volumes of green cloth with leather spine labels. Binding worn, sturdy. Contents near fine, with covers and advertisements bound in. $125

Suburban Life. 1911. Volumes 12 and 13, January to December, bound in one volumes of green cloth with leather spine labels. Binding worn, sturdy. Contents near fine, with covers and advertisements bound in. SOLD

Suburban Life. 1912. Volumes 14 and 15, January to December, bound in one volumes of green cloth with leather spine labels. Binding worn, sturdy. Contents near fine, with covers and advertisements bound in. $125

Suburban Life. 1914. Volumes 16 and 17, January to December, bound in one volumes of green cloth with leather spine labels. Binding worn, sturdy. Contents near fine, with covers and advertisements bound in. SOLD

The Troubadour Poet Speaks His Heart

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Vachel Lindsay. The Village Magazine (author, Springfield, IL: 1920, second edition). Small folio. VG, with general edge wear and loss to the corners. New spine. 128 pages, Profusely illustrated. SOLD
          Vachel Lindsay (1879-1931) was one of the great personalities in American literature: charismatic, overpowering, at turns ebullient and severely depressed, a mystic, an illustrator, an authentic voice, and an unselfconscious showman. A son of the mid-west, he grew up in Springfield, Illinois, and became his hometown’s unofficial poet laureate, singing its praises and boorishness whether his fellow townsfolk liked it or not (mostly not). After years of tramping, as he called it, and years of being unable to find a place for himself in the workaday world, he literally burst onto the American scene in 1913 with his paean to the founder of the Salvation Army “General William Booth Enters Into Heaven.” It was America’s first exposure to one of his chant poems (the most famous being “The Congo”, an amazing theatre piece now labeled racist and largely ignored) and no one chanted quite like Lindsay. His over-the-top renditions of his rhythmic cacaphonic chant poems stunned his audiences into silence, then mirth, then admiration. He was, in short, an original. All the powers that be in the poetry world — Harriet Monroe, William Butler Yeats, Ezra Pound, and many others — declared him so. But his time on top was brief. After the war, even while he continued to perform in front of packed houses, the cognescenti come to regard him as a cheap vaudevillian, hardly a poet at all. In an increasingly common fit of despair in 1931 he drank some bleach and died, remembered in newspapers across the country but largely written off by the literary community. In 1910, when Lindsay was know to almost no one, he self-published a first edition of 700 copies of The Village Magazine, 75 pages of his poems and whimsical drawings. In 1920, he self-published a second, revised and enlarged, edition of 1,000 copies that like the first edition was not for sale but unlike the first edition was quickly exhausted. During his professional and personal decline in 1925, he published third and fourth editions of 800 copies each, both of which were primarily reprints of the second edition. The Village Magazine is about as idiosyncratic and original a statement as any 20th century American poet made for distribution. Copies are uncommon.