Recent Acquisitions

Here are some of our most RECENT ACQUISITIONS available for purchase:

A Complete Run of a Beautiful Satire Magazine

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Cocorico (Paris)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (December 31, 1898) to Vol. 5, No. 63 (May 1, 1902), comprising 63 issues, published bi-weekly through May 1901 and sporadically thereafter, unbound as issued, housed in three binders, two being from the publisher (featuring art by Steinlen) and one being homemade. Near fine throughout except for two oversized issues, which have crimping at the edges. $3,600
          This is an exceptional complete run of the celebrated and beautiful French satirical magazine created by Paul Boutigny (1854-1929). It had as its contributors many of the best artists of the Art Nouveau movement. Leading the way was Alphonse Mucha, who designed six covers, the title bar, and many black and white interior drawings. Other Cocorico artists included De Feure, Grun, Helleu, Kupka, Leandre, Pal, Popineau, H. Riviere, Roubille, Steinlen, Villon, Willette and others. Many of the notable names in French literature of the period contributed text or poems, such as Allais, T. Bernard, Coppee, Courteline, Loti, Renard, Richepin, Rictus, Rollinat, and others. This run is prized by collectors of Art Nouveau, especially poster fans, and difficult to find complete.

America’s First Great Magazine of the Arts

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The Crayon (New York)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 3, 1855) to Vol. 2, No. 26 (December 26, 1855), comprising 52 issues, the first year and a complete run of its incarnation as a weekly, bound in the publisher’s cloth. Quartos. Bindings VG+, 1/2″ split to the hinge cloth on volume 1, slight loss to the bottom of the spine cloth on volume 2. Contents near fine. Advertising pages bound in. $800
          The Crayon was America’s first great arts magazine. It was founded and edited in its first year by W.J . Stillman, an artist and journalist, who made his name as art critic for the New York Evening Post. Contributors included William Cullen Bryant, James Russell Lowell, Rembrandt Peale, WM Rossetti, and John Ruskin. Each issue featured substantive articles on issues and controversies in the art world, exhibition reviews, book notices, and domestic art gossip, all conveyed to the reader with authority and style. As every art researcher knows, The Crayon is the primary source for information and insight into the American art world during its short, six-and-a half year run. Quite scarce.

America’s First Great Radical Magazine

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The Free Enquirer (New York)
NS Vol. 2, No. 1 (October 31, 1829) to No. 52 (October 25, 1830), comprising 52 issues in all, unbound. Quartos. VG, with rough spines, some of which are archivally mended, and occasional foxing. The title page, laid into the first issue, features an attractive though stained lithographic view of The Free Enquirer publishing office. An index to the volume is laid into the final issue. SOLD
          The Free Enquirer began life in 1825 as The New Harmony Gazette. It was the official publication of Robert Owen’s socialist experiment on the banks of the Wabash. Instead of folding it when the New Harmony community disintegrated in 1828, Robert Dale Owen, Owen’s son, and his associate, the irrepressible free-thinking Frances Wright, brought it to New York. Freed from the narrow confines of reporting on the progress (actually, decline) of New Harmony, The Free Enquirer became a wide-ranging weekly supporting socialism, equal rights for women, free love and birth control, and agnosticism, not always in that order. Nearly all of its original content was written by Owen or Wright. Mott, with characteristic understatement, says of the weekly, “With such striking personalities in charge, The Free Enquirer was of course interesting.” (Mott/I/538) It was more than interesting — it was incendiary. To advocate communalism and woman’s suffrage and to attack religion and the conventions of marriage in the early 19th century was a guarantee of ostracism and ridicule and perhaps even an invitation for death at the hands of an angry mob. That this publication lasted for seven years is nothing short of a miracle. For six months of this volume, Fanny Wright toured the country, sending in the text of her lectures and letters from the field. For four months of this volume, the intellectually restless Orestes Brownson weighed in as well as a “corresponding editor” out of Auburn, New York, after having abandoned Universalism for the Free Thought movement. The Free Enquirer is the grandmother of all American radical magazines.

Condy Raguet Campaigns for Free Trade

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Free Trade Advocate (Philadelphia)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 3, 1829) to Vol. 2, No. 22 (November 28, 1829), comprising 48 weekly issues, a complete run, bound in two volumes of contemporary leather and marbled boards. Octavos. Binding VG-, with deterioration to leather spines. Contents very good, with occasional modest foxing. Title pages and indexes bound in. $400
          The Free Trade Advocate was founded and edited by Condy Raguet, an American politician of French descent who by 1829 had already had a long career as a Federalist in Pennsylvania state politics and the American diplomatic corps. As a businessman, he was one of the founders of the Philadelphia Savings Fund Society, the first savings bank in the United States. The Panic of 1819 transformed Raguet into one of the most prominent advocates of free trade in the United States. He contributed free trade articles to The Portfolio and other leading magazines before founding The Free Trade Advocate in Philadelphia in 1829. The weekly devoted considerable space to the issues of free trade and protection, the banking system, and manufacturing, reprinted speeches both contemporary and from the past that supported its positions, reported on pertinent legislation, petitions, and gatherings around the country, and noticed books and articles of interest to its readers. Before completing the second volume of the Advocate, Raguet concluded that the narrow focus of the journal was preventing him from gaining the audience he sought. So, in early December he abandoned the Advocate in favor of issuing The Banner of the Constitution, a folio. The format was different, but the content remained much the same. Other projects followed, including an esteemed book on economics. Raguet ranks high among the leading voices in American economic matters in the first half of the 19th century.

John Hancock Slept Here

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Hancock House, Beacon St. Boston, Mass. : Residence of the late John Hancock, first signer of the Declaration of Independence. Built 1737. (Boston: J. H. Bufford Lith., [1859]). Hand-colored lithograph. Image size: 16″ x 13″. Frame size: 21″ x 17″. Print shows some discoloration and stains to margins, but the image is bright and clean. Frame is nicked and dinged, but still handsome. $425
          This print, draw by J. P. Newell, published by Clement Drew, and printed by J. H. Bufford, presents a front exterior view of John Hancock’s house on Beacon Street, Boston, as it appeared just before the Civil War. Depicted are two women in hoop skirts lingering near the front doorsteps, while in the foreground pedestrians pass on the sidewalk. This print was issued on the occasion of a proposal by the sitting governor, Nathaniel Banks, to made the Hancock House the official residence of the governors of the state. The proposal was voted down, however, and the building was demolished to considerable outcry in 1863. OCLC records one holding at the Boston Athenaeum. Scarce.

An 1850s Publisher’s Promotional Broadsheet

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Life Illustrated Extra (New York: Fowler and Wells, [1857]). Broadsheet (17.25″ x 12.5″). 4 pages. Near fine, with minor spotting $325
          This is a promotional broadsheet for the magazine Life Illustrated and more generally the publications of the house of Fowler and Wells, better known as the publishers of The Phrenological Journal and The Water-Cure Journal. The first page is given over to prose and poetry typical to any issue of Life Illustrated. The centerspread features the portraits of the first 15 American presidents, Washington to Buchanan, surrounding précises of their three periodicals. The final page features the publisher’s book list. OCLC shows no holdings.

The First Magazine Appearances of Poetry by Walt Whitman

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The New World (New York)
Vol. 2, No. 1 (July 3, 1841) to No. 26 (December 25, 1841), comprising 26 issues, bound in leather and cloth. Folio. Binding good, leather cracked and scuffed. Contents near fine, with minor spotting. Title page and index bound in. SOLD
          The New World was the brainchild of Park Benjamin (1809-1864), poet, journalist, and editor, who intended it to be a literary weekly with an emphasis on serial fiction. In May of 1841, a down-and-out journeyman writer named Walt Whitman took a job as a compositor with the weekly. He was accorded a new respect by his employer when two of his short stories appeared in August and November in the United States Magazine and Democratic Review. Perhaps motivated by his disdain for Benjamin’s poetic effusions, Whitman showed him how it should be done by submitting the poem “Each Has His Grief” for publication. Benjamin printed it in the issue of November 20, 1841, marking Whitman’s first appearance as a poet in an American magazine. Also printed in that issue was Whitman’s short story “The Child’s Champion.” Another Whitman poem, “The Punishment of Pride,” soon followed, appearing in the December 18, 1841, issue. These three pieces constitute Whitman’s entire output for The New World, leaving as he did soon after to cast his fate with The New York Aurora, save for his temperance novel Franklin Evans, which Benjamin published as an extra in November of the following year. An important Whitman item.

The Magazine for Southern Sympathizers and Racists

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The Old Guard (New York)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1863) to Vol. 6, No. 12 (December 1868), comprising 57 issues (several are combined monthly issues), bound in six volumes of cloth and leather and cloth. Octavos. Volumes 1 through 3 in publisher’s cloth, with loss to top and bottom of spines. Contents fair, with waterstaining through all three volumes. Volumes 4 through 6 in half leather, with wear to hinges. Contents VG+, with occasional foxing. $900
          The Old Guard was the only consistently anti-Lincoln Copperhead publication of the Civil War. It began erratic publication in 1862, but it was suppressed by the Federal Government during a general crackdown on the press in 1862. When those restrictions were eased at the end of the year, editor Chauncey Burr resumed publication in January of 1863. (The first two numbers of the 1863 volume are identified as Vol. 2, nos. 1 and 2. But then Burr decided to consider the January 1863 issue the true first issue of volume 1, so the March issue bears the Vol. 1, No. 3 designation. Subsequent issues are numbered accordingly, and most of the editorial matter from the first (suppressed) volume is reprinted in the latter half of the 1863 volume.) The Civil War volumes bristle with astounding, angry diatribes against the war effort in general, and abolitionism and Lincoln in particular. Mott tells us, “The Old Guard defended slavery and the right of secession, attacked President Lincoln violently in every number, and urged the cessation of the war. It was, it claimed ‘the only magazine published in the United States which is devoted to the fearless and uncompromising exposure of the monstrous crimes and frauds of the party in power.'” After the war, the magazine vilified the Radical Republicans and their program for reconstruction. And it continued to hammer at the issue of white superiority of all races of color. Each volume is illustrated with engravings initially of anti-Lincoln political leaders (eight in volume 1, ten in volume 2) and later of unreconstructed Southerners. The 1868 volume features six chromolithographs of different races, accompanied by articles purporting to detail their inferior traits. We hear a good deal about the opposition Lincoln faced within the North during the Civil War, but that opposition was, in fact, poorly organized and largely inarticulate. The press, by and large, supported the Union effort, even when it occasionally differed over tactics. These volumes then constitute an extraordinary historical document, preserving a highly discredited point-of-view. Scarce and desirable.

The Roots of Manga

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Toyko Puck (Toyko)
Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1, 1911) to No. 36 (December 20, 1911), comprising 35 issues (published the
1st, 10th, and 20th of each month, one being a double issue), a complete year, unbound. Small folios. VG+, a few rough spines, toning to the cover of the first issue. SOLD
          Toyko Puck was Japan’s greatest and most influential political satire magazine. It was founded by Yasuji Kitazawa (1876 – 1955), better known by the pen name Rakuten Kitazawa, who is considered by many to be the founding father of modern manga. He was the first professional cartoonist in Japan and the first to use the term “manga” in its modern sense. His cartooning career began in 1895, when he joined the staff of the English-language magazine Box of Curios, under the art direction of Australian Frank Nankivell, later to become a cartoonist for Puck of New York. From 1899 to 1904, Rakuten drew cartoons and comic strips for the Tokyo dailies. In 1905, he launched Toyko Puck, named after the American magazine he deeply admired. It was the first full-color satire magazine in Japan and was an immediate success. It featured Japanese and English cartoon captions and was sold not only in Japan but also in the Korean peninsula, mainland China, and Taiwan. The blogpost Three Steps over Japan said of Rakuten: “He attacked anything that he deemed a worthy target, from corrupt politicians to bankers stealing people’s money. Other cartoonists bent under government pressure; Rakuten didn’t, taking the issue of censorship head on in his magazine. When the railroads were nationalized, Rakuten pilloried the heads of seventeen formerly private companies who had pocketed the dividends. One of the company presidents saw the cartoon and was so ashamed that he distributed his dividends among the workers. They in turn visited Tokyo Puck’s offices to thank Rakuten personally.” Sometime during 1911 Rakuten left Toyko Puck for reasons unknown and for two years published a competing magazine, Rakuten Puck. When that failed he returned to Tokyo Puck and then went back to newspaper work for the remainder of his career. The highlight of this year is the 6th anniversary issue published in April. It features eight full-color thematically linked doublespreads. Full years of Toyko Puck almost never appear on the American market.

The Washingtonian Movement: An 1840s Alcoholics Anonymous

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View of the Grand Mass Washingtonian Convention on Boston Common on the 30th of May 1844. (Boston: F. Gleason, 1844). Hand-colored lithograph. Image size: 8.5″ x 13.75″. Frame size: 14.5″ x 19″. Print shows even toning and a few stains to margins, but the image is clean. Frame is well nicked, with loss to surface paint. $425
          The Washingtonians were a temperance movement that anticipated Alcoholics Anonymous by 100 years. It was founded in Baltimore in April 1840 by six alcoholics who believed that by relying on one another they could remain sober. This was in contrast to the temperance movement that emphasized legislation over personal responsibility. Members proselytized to other alcoholics and welcomed them into their brotherhood. The movement met with spectacular success, reportedly recruiting as many as 600,000 members within a few years. This view celebrates the Washingtonians’ first and last national convention, which reportedly attracted thirty thousand people. But the movement, by then, was already in decline, splintering into a multitude of factions wanting to emphasize other controversial social reforms as well, such as prohibition, secular religion, political action, even abolition. This print was issued by Frederick Gleason. Long before his Gleason’s Pictorial Drawing Room Companion (1851), even before his Flag of Our Union (1846), Gleason attempted to compete with the Kelloggs of Hartford and Currier of New York in the printing of decorative hand-colored lithographs for the home market. This might be his first print. Based on the address (1½ Tremont Row), his time as a publisher of lithographs was short, no more than two years, ending at the latest in 1846. Scarce.

Genthe’s Striking Portrait of Woodrow Wilson

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Arnold Genthe. [Portrait of Woodrow Wilson]. Original photograph. Image: 11 .75″ x 9.25″. Mat: 20″ x 16″. Near fine. $300
          This is a matted photograph of Woodrow Wilson taken by Arnold Genthe at the White House in 1916. It appears on page 127 of Genthe’s autobiography As I Remember (NY: Reynal and Hitchcock, 1936). Genthe is regarded as one of the great portrait photographers of the early 20th century. This is a terrific image, accompanied by the 28th president’s crisp and clean signature. From the estate of Malcolm S. Forbes.